Free counter and web stats 2012-06-15 A Welsh to English Dictionary in page format

http://www.kimkat.org/amryw/1_vortaroy/geiriadur_cymraeg_saesneg_BAEDD_n_1047e.htm  09-08-2012

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La Web de Gal
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The Wales-Catalonia Website


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An Internet dictionary of Welsh for speakers of English

 

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TUDALENNAU ERAILL Y GEIRIADUR HWN

OTHER PAGES IN THIS DICTIONARY


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7000_kimkat1580e.jpgA

 

7000_kimkat2709e.jpgAR

7000_kimkat1039e.jpgBA

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7000_kimkat1018e.jpgCA

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7000_kimkat1675e.jpgCI

 

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7000_kimkat1021e.jpgGA

 

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7000_kimkat1676e.jpgI, J, K

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7000_kimkat1677e.jpgMI

 

 

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7000_kimkat1586e.jpgY, Z

 

 

 

 

 

 

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++
N, n en <EN> [ɛn] feminine noun
1
) fourteenth letter of the twenty-six letter Roman alphabet
...1 a, 2 b, 3 c, 4 d 5 e, 6 f, 7 g, 8 h, 9 i, 10 j, 11 k, 12 l, 13 m, 14 n, 15 o, 16 p, 17 q, 18 r, 19 s, 20 t, 21 u, 22 v, 23 w, 24 x, 25 y, 26 z
2
) eighteenth letter of the twenty-nine letter Welsh alphabet
...1 a, 2 b, 3 c, 4 ch, 5 d, 6 dd 7 e, 8 f, 9 ff, 10 g, 11 ng, 12 h, 13 i, 14 j, 15 l, 16 ll, 17 m, 18 n, 19 o, 20 p, 21 ph, 22 r, 23 rh, 24 s, 25 t, 26 th, 27 u, 28 w, 29 y

:_______________________________.

++n- n
1
a proclitic n- before a vowel is a reduction of the determiner yn (= my), used colloquially and corresponding to standard Welsh fy (= my)

Fossilised with some names and a term of address

..a/
nanti (a vocative form of anti, from English auntie, or used as a title followed by a personal name) auntie

(n = my) + (anti)
Nanti Jn Auntie Jane
(However, it might be a straight English borrowing, since nauntie exists or has existed in English, where it is mine auntie > nauntie)


..b/
Now a pet form of Owen (n = my) + (Ow, first syllable of Owen)

..c/
Ned a pet form of Edward (n = my) + (Ed, first syllable of Edward) (though this may be a straight borrowing from English, where it is mine Ed > Ned)

..d/ Nel a pet form of Elen (n = my) + (El, first syllable of Elen)

 

..c/ nwncwl (a vocative form of wncwl, from English uncle, or used as a title followed by a personal name) (n = my) + (wncwl) (However, it might be a straight English borrowing, since nuncle exists or has existed in English, where it is mine uncle > nuncle)

:_______________________________.

++n- n

..a/ excrescent n

adarn (dialect Welsh) (= birds) < adar

masarn (= maple tree) < masar < English mazer < Old English maeser-

siswrn (standard Welsh) (= scissors) < siswr < English scissor

An example of this phenomenon in English is
wyvern {wivərn} (= mythological winged snake) < (wyver) + (excrescent -n); < Norman wivre < Latin vpera


..b/ simplification of a consonant cluster: in some dialects ns > s

 

Jns > Jos (i.e. Jōs) (surname Jones)

comins > comis (commons, commonland)

 


:_______________________________.

..b/ loss of a final n

cyfan (complete) > cyfa (northern colloquial)

Bodidda < Bodiddan (medieval township in Henryd, Conwy)
BODIDDA, a township in the parish of Gyffin, and hundred of Isaf, in the county of Carnarvon, North Wales, 1 mile from Conway. National Gazetteer, 1868

:_______________________________.

..1 ++na <NAA> [nɑː ] NAA (negative particle)

nac before a vowel
1
not

2 do not.... imperative (formal, on public signs, etc)
Na cherddwch ar y glaswellt Keep off the grass (Do not walk on the grass)
Nac ysmygwch Do not smoke
:_______________________________.

..2 ++na <NAA> [nɑː ] (conjunction)
1
(in negative sentence) or, nor

Weles i ddim bachgen na merch yno I didnt see any boy or any girl there, I saw neither boy nor girl there

Nid ei di byth uwch bawd na sawdl Youll never get anywhere, youll never make it, youll never make the grade, youre doomed to failure (you wont go higher than a toe or a heel)

Nid oedd ganddo y rhithyn lleiaf o awdurdod na phwys yn y cwmni
He didnt have the least bit of authority or importance in the company

:_______________________________.

..3 ++na <NAA> [nɑː ] masculine noun
1
no
Chymer hi ddim na yn ateb She wont take no for an answer

Mae e wedi gwahardd y gair na yn y sefyllfa honno
He has prohibited the word no in that situation

Na mawr oedd yr ateb a gefais A definite no was the answer I got

ateb na plaen answer with a clear no

dweud na yn blwmp ac yn blaen give a definite no

Dyw e byth wedi miestroli'r grefft o ddeud Na Hes never mastered the art of saying No.

Y na piau hi The noes have it

ETYMOLOGY: Independent use of the preverbal negative particle
na (= not)

:_______________________________.

..4 ++na <NAA> [nɑː ] relative pronoun

1
(is the one) who-not, (is the one) that-not, (is the one) which-not
Dalla o bawb na fynn weld There is none so blind as those who will not see
((the) blindest of everybody (is the one) who-not wants seeing), who insists on not seeing

:_______________________________.

++naath NAATH [nɑː θ] verb
NOTE: (usually spelt
nath)

1
southern form of gwnaeth / wnaeth (= he / she / it did; he / she / it made; third person singular of the preterite gwneud = to do). See aa

NOTE: (also spelt nath / nth)

2
naath < wnaath < wnaeth < a wnaeth who did, who made; which did, which made.

This is (a relative pronoun = who, which, that) + soft mutation + (gwnaeth = he / she / it did; third person singular of the preterite gwneud = to do)

Pa beth a wnaeth ef? > Be naath e? What did he do? ((it is) what thing that he did?)

:_______________________________.

++nth NTH [nːθ] verb
1 south-eastern form of gwnaeth / wnaeth (= he / she / it did; he / she / it made
Usually spelt nth / nth
See aa / gwnaath

:_______________________________.

++nabob <NAA-bob> [ˡnɑˑbɔb] masculine noun
PLURAL
nabobs <NAA-bobz> [ˡnɑˑbɔbz]
1
nabob = (1700, 1800s) person who became rich in the East, especially India

2
nabob = important person

3
nabob = member of a local power lite
Ond dyna'r dewis addysgol gorau, meddai'r nabobs yn Neuadd y Sir
But that's the best educational choice say the nabobs of County Hall

ETYMOLOGY
: English nabob < Portuguese nababo < Hindi nawwb (= powerful Muslim landowner) < Arabic nuwwb (= respectful), plural form of na'ib (= deputy, governor)

:_______________________________.

++nabod <NAA-bod> [ˡnɑˑbɔd] NA bod (verb)
1
colloquial reduction of
adnabod <ad-NAA-bod> [adˡnɑˑbɔd] (= to know)

:_______________________________.

++nadel <NAA-del> [ˡnɑˑdɛl] verb [ˈnaˑdɛl]
1
(county of Ceredigion) to prevent
Variant of
nadu (= prevent)

ETYMOLOGY:
nadel < nadael (nad-, stem of nadu) + (alternative verb suffix el < -ael).

Cf
gadael (= to leave), colloquially gadel, which in some meanings is a replacement of an original gadu

Also Ceredigion
galler (= to be able), apparently a dissimulated form of gallel
This is
standard Welsh gallu (= to be able)
(
gall-, stem of gallu = to be able) + (alternative termination el < -ael).

:_______________________________.

++na bw na be <na BUU na BEE> [nɑː ˡbuː na ˡbeː]
1
not a word;
Ddywedodd e na bw na be He didn't say a word

(Literally neither bw nor be)

:_______________________________.

++nabyddiaeth (nabyddieth) na-BƏDH-yaith, -yeth [naˈbəjɛθ, naˈbəjaɪθ]
1
knowledge, acquaintance

colli nabyddieth ar (rywun) forget who (someone) is (lose acquaintance on somebody)

ETYMOLOGY: colloquial form of
adnabyddiaeth, with the loss of the first syllable

:_______________________________.

++..1 nacw <NA-ku> [ˡnakʊ] pronoun
North Wales

1
hwn acw (refers to a masculine noun)
..a/, he, it, the one; the person previously mentioned


..b/ that one there; the person or thing indicated or pointed out
Roedd hi eisiau gwybod enw pob blodeuyn a llysieuyn. Beth am hwn? Dyma glust llygoden y felin, a nacw tu l iddo, y pannog melyn.
She wanted to know the name of every flower and herb. What about this one? This is Snow-in-summer, and that one behind it is great mullein

..c/
so-and-so; a man whose name is forgotten, whose name is not necessary to mention, whose name is unknown

2
hon acw (refers to a feminine noun)
..a/ she, it, the one the person previously mentioned


..b/ that one there; the person or thing indicated or pointed out

..c/ the wife, the missus
In South Wales
honco sda fi (this one yonder that is with me)

..d/
so-and-so; a woman whose name is forgotten, whose name is not necessary to mention, whose name is unknown

ETYMOLOGY: this one over there
(1) (
hwn = this one masculine) + (acw = over there, yonder)
(2) (
hon = this one feminine) + (acw = over there, yonder)

:_______________________________.

++..2 nacw <NAA-ku> [ˡnɑˑkʊ]
(South-east Wales)

1
I am not
os nacw in camsyniad (= os nad wyf yn camsynied) if Im not mistaken

NOTE:
nacw < nagw < nag wyf < nag wy < nad wyf

(1)
nag wyf. This is properly an echo answer, spelt in modern Welsh nac wyf <NAAG uiv> [ˡnɑːg ʊɪv] Wyt ti? (= are you) Nac wyf (= I am not). There is properly no simple word for no in such answers. In southern dialects, nac wyf / nag wyf has replaced nad wyf (= that I am not)

(2)
nag wyf behaves as a disyllable word; the final [v] is lost (a phenomenon in many Welsh polysyllables), and the final <ui> [ʊɪ] is reduced to the vowel <u> [ʊ] (a usual occurrence in spoken Welsh)

(3)
nagw <NAA-gu> [ˡnɑː gʊ] > <NAA-ku> [ˡnɑː kʊ]. In south-eastern Welsh, [g] at the beginning of a final syllable is devoiced to [k]

:_______________________________.

++nad <NAAD> [nɑː d] (particle)
1
that...not (before a verb beginning with a vowel)

:_______________________________.

++Naddawan <na-DHAU-an> [naˡaʊan]
1
Afon Naddawan is the former name of Afon Ddawan in south-east Wales (River Thaw)

ETYMOLOGY: Unknown.

NOTE: A very characteristic feature of Welsh is the loss of a pretonic syllable, as in this name: na|ddaw|an > ddaw|an

:_______________________________.

++naddo <NAA-dho> [ˡnɑˑɔ] (phrase)
1 no (reply to a verb in the past tense)

:_______________________________.

++nad oedd e <naad OIDH e> [nɑː ˑˡd ɔɪ ɛ] (verb)
1
that he wasn't

2 with reduction oe > o

nad odd e <na DOODH e> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑɛ]

:_______________________________.

++nad oeddech chi <na DOI-dhe khi> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪɛxɪ] (verb)
1
that you weren't

2 with reduction oe > o, and loss of dd


nad och chi
<na DOO khi> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑxɪ]
:_______________________________.

++nad oedden nhw <na-DOI-dhe-nu> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪɛnʊ] (verb)
1
that they weren't

2 with reduction oe > o, and loss of dd

nad on nhw <na-DOO-nu> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑnʊ]

:_______________________________.

++nad oedden ni <na-DOI-dhe-ni> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪɛnɪ] (verb)
1
that we weren't

2 with reduction oe > o, and loss of dd

nad on ni <na-DOO-ni> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑnɪ]

:_______________________________.

++nad oeddet ti <na-DOI-dhe-ti> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪɛtɪ] na DOI dhe ti (verb)
1
that you weren't

2 with reduction oe > o, and loss of dd


nad ot ti <na-DOO-ti> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑɛtɪ]

:_______________________________.

++nad oedd hi <na-DOI-dh hi, na-DOI-dhi> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪhɪ, nɑˑˡdɔɪɪ] (verb)
1
(she) that she wasn't

2 with reduction oe > o

nad odd hi <na-DOO-dh hi, na-DOO-dhi> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑ hɪ, nɑˑˡdoˑɪ]

:_______________________________.

++nad oeddwn i <na-DOI-dhu ni> [nɑː ˑˡdɔɪʊnɪ] (verb)
1
that I wasn't

2 with reduction oe > o, and loss of dd, and loss of dd

nad oeddwn i <na-DOO ni> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑnɪ]

:_______________________________.

++Nadolig <na-DOO-lig> [nɑː ˑˡdoˑlɪg] (masculine noun)
1
Christmas
Nadolig Llawen a Blwyddyn Newydd Dda
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

2
Noswyl Nadolig Christmas Eve (24 December)

3 carol Nadolig Christmas carol

:_______________________________.

++nadredd <NA-dredh> [ˡnadrɛ]
1
snakes. Plural form of neidr <NEI-dir> [ˡnəɪdɪr] = snake

:_______________________________.

++nadroedd <NA-droidh, -odh> [ˡnadrɔɪ, -ɔ]
1
snakes.

 

Plural form of neidr (neidir) <NEI-dir> [ˡnəɪdɪr] = snake

:_______________________________.

++nadu <NAA-di> [ˡnɑˑdɪ] (verb)
1
hinder, prevent

:_______________________________.

++na fasa <NAA va-sa> [ˡnɑː ˡvasa] (verb)
1
(North-west) (reply) no, he she it wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sa> [nɑː ˡvasa] that he she it wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasach <NAA va-sakh> [ˡnɑː ˡvasax] (verb)
1
(North-west) (reply) no, you wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sakh> [nɑː ˡvasax] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasach chi (verb) <na-VA-sa-khi> [ˡnaˡvaˡsaxɪ]
1
(North-west) that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasa fo <NA va-sa-vo> [nɑː vaˡsavɔ] (verb)
1
(she) (North-west) that he wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasan (= nhw) <na-VA-san> [nɑː ˡvasan] na VA san (verb)
1
(North-west) (reply) no, they wouldn't be
2
that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasan (= ni) <NAA va-san> [ˡnɑː ˡvasan] (verb)
1
(North-west) (reply) no, we wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-san> [nɑː ˡvasan] that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasan nhw <na-VA-sa-nu> [nɑː ˡvasanʊ] (verb)
1
(North-west) that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasan ni <na-VA-sa-nɪ> [nɑː ˡvasanɪ] (verb)
1
(North-west) that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasat <NAA va-sat> [ˡnɑː ˡvasat] (verb) (reply)

1 (North-west) you wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sat> [nɑː ˡvasat] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasat ti <na-VA-sat> [nɑː ˡvasatɪ] (verb)
1
(North-west) that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fase <na-VA-se> [nɑː ˡvasɛ] (verb)
1
(reply) that he wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasech <NAA va-sekh> [ˡnɑː ˡvasɛx] (verb)
1
(reply) no, you wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sekh> [nɑː ˡvasɛx] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasech chi <na-VA-se-khi> [nɑː ˡvasɛxɪ] (verb)
1
that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fase fe <na-VA-se-ve> [nɑː ˡvasɛvɛ] (verb)
1
that he wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fase fo <na-VA-se-vo> [nɑː ˡvasɛvɔ] (verb)
1
(she) (North-east) that he wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fase hi <na-VA-se-hi> [nɑː ˡvasɛhɪ] (verb)
1
that she wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasen (= nhw) (verb) <NAA va-sen> [ˡnɑː ˡvasɛn]
1
(reply) no, they wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sen> [naˡvasɛn] that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasen (= ni) <NAA va-sen> [ˡnɑː ˡvasɛn] (verb)
1
(reply) no, we wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sen> [naˡvasɛn] that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fasen nhw <na-VA-se-nu> [naˡvasɛnʊ] (verb)
1
that they wouldn't be


:_______________________________.

++na fasen ni <na-VA-se-ni> [naˡvasɛnɪ] (verb)
1
that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na faset <NAA va-set> [ˡnɑː ˡvasɛt] (verb)
1
(reply) no, you wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-set> [nɑː ˡvasɛt] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na faset ti <na-VA-se-ti> [nɑː ˡvasɛtɪ] (verb)
1
that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na faswn <na-VA-sun> [ˡnɑː ˡvasʊn] (verb)
1
(reply) no, I wouldn't be
2
<na-VA-sun> [nɑː ˡvasʊn] that I wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na faswn i <na-VA-sun-i> [nɑː ˡvasʊnɪ] (verb)
1
that I wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++naffta <NAF-ta> [ˡnafta] ?masculine noun
1
Patagonian Welsh (American: gas, gasoline) (Englandic: petrol)

ETYMOLOGY: Castilian of Argentina:
nafta (= gasoline, petrol)
:_______________________________.

++nafsan <NAV-san> [ˡnavsan] v
1 (tag) colloquial for
na fuasant? = (they wouldnt) would they?
Na, fysa nhw ddim yn neud hynny, nafsan? No, they wouldnt do that, would they?

ETYM
OLOGY: (na) + soft mutation + (buasant).
na fuasant > na fuasan
> na fasan > na fysan > na fsan / nafsan

:_______________________________.

++na fydd na VIIDH e (verb) <NAA VIIDH> [ˡnɑː ˡviː] (verb)
1 (reply) no, he-she-it won't be

2 that he-she-it won't be
<na VIIDH> [nɑː ˡviː] that I won't be
:_______________________________.

++na fydda <NAA və-dha> [ˡnɑː vəa] (verb)
1
(reply) no, I won't be
2
<na VƏ-dha> [nɑː ˡvəa] that I won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydda i <NAA və-dhai> [ˡnɑː ˡvəaɪ] (verb)
1
that I won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddan <NAA və-dhan> [ˡnɑː vəˡan] (verb)
1
(reply) no, they won't be
2
<na-VƏ-dhan> [nɑː ˡvəan] that they won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddan nhw <na VƏ-dha nu> [nɑː ˡvəa nʊ] (verb)
1
that they won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydde <NAA və-dhe> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛ] (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, he she it wouldn't be
2
<na-VƏ-dhe> [nɑː ˡvəɛ] that he she it wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddech <NAA və-dhekh> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛx] (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, you wouldn't be
2
<na-VƏ-dhekh> [nɑː ˡvəɛx] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddech chi <na VƏ-dhe khi> [nɑː ˡvəɛ xɪ] (verb)
1
(South) that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydde fe <na VƏ-dhe ve> [nɑː ˡvəɛ vɛ] (verb)
1
(South) that he wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydde hi <na VƏ-dhe hi> [nɑː ˡvəɛ hɪ] (verb)
1
(South) that she wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydden (= nhw) <NAA və-dhen> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛn] na VƏ dhen (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, they wouldn't be
2
<na VƏ-dhen> [nɑː ˡvəɛn] that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydden (= ni) <NAA-və-dhen> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛn] (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, we wouldn't be
2
<na VƏ-dhen> [nɑː ˡvəɛn] that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydden nhw <na VƏ-dhe nu> [nɑː ˡvəɛ nʊ]
(verb)
1
that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydden ni <NAA-və-dhe ni> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛ nɪ] (verb)
1
that we wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddet <NAA-və-dhet> [ˡnɑː ˡvəɛt] (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, you wouldn't be
2
<na VƏ-dhet> [nɑː ˡvəɛt] that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddet ti <na VƏ-dhe ti> [nɑː ˡvəɛ tɪ] (verb)
1
that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydd e <na VIIDH-e> [nɑː ˡviˑɛ] (verb)
(South) that he won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddech chi <na VƏ-dhe-khi> [nɑː ˡvə ɛ xɪ] (verb)
1
that you wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydd hi <na VIIDH-hi, VII-dhi> [nɑː ˡviˑ hɪ, na ˡviˑɪ] (verb)
1
(she) that she won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddi <NAA və-dhi> [nɑː ˡvəɪ] (verb)
1
(South) (reply) no, you won't be
<NAA VƏ-dhi> [nɑː ˡvəɪ] that you won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddi di <na VƏ-dhi-di> [nɑː ˡvəɪ dɪ] (verb)
1
that you won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydd o <na VIIDH o > [nɑː ˡviːɔ] (verb)
1
(she) (North) that he won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddwch <NAA və-dhukh> [ˡnɑː ˡvəʊx] (verb)
1
(reply) no, you won't be
2
that you won't be
<NA və-dhukh> [nɑː ˡvəʊx]

:_______________________________.

++na fyddwch chi <na VƏ -dhu-khi> [nɑː ˡvəʊxɪ] (verb)
1
that you won't be


:_______________________________.

++na fyddwn <NAA və-dhun> [ˡnɑː ˡvəʊn] (verb)
1
(reply) no, we won't be
2
<na VƏ-dhun> [nɑː ˡvəʊn] that we won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddwn <NAA və-dhun> [ˡnɑː ˡvəʊn] (verb)
1
(reply) no, they wouldnt be
2
<na VƏ-dhun> [nɑː ˡvəʊn] that they wouldn't be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddwn i <na VƏ-dhun-i> [nɑː ˡvəʊnɪ] (verb)
1
that I wouldnt be

:_______________________________.

++na fyddwn ni <na VƏ-dhu-ni> [nɑː ˡvəʊnɪ] (verb)
1
that we won't be

:_______________________________.

++na fydd <NAA viidh> [ˡnɑː ˡviˑ] (verb)
1
(reply) no, he she it won't be
2
<na VIIDH> [nɑː ˡviˑ] that he-she-it won't be

:_______________________________.

++nag <NAAG> [nɑː g]
1
not (negative particle)

:_______________________________.

++nage <NAA-ge> [ˡnɑˑgɛ] (phrase)
1
(reply) no

-
Ti wnaeth hyn? Nage Did you do this? No

:_______________________________.

++nag o <NAAG oo, NAG o> [ˡnɑːg oː, ˡnɑg ɔ]
1
than of
In contrasting after an expression expressing quantity with
o = of

mwy o fwg nag o dn more noise than substance, a lot of talk and little action (more of smoke than of fire)

ETYMOLOGY:
nag, before vowels a form of na = than) + (o = of)

:_______________________________.

++nag oedd <NAAG oidh> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪ] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oedd
1
(reply) no, he she it wasn't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddach <NAAG oi-dhakh> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪax] (verb)
Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddych

1 (North-west) (reply) no, you weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddan <NAAG oi-dhan> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪan] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddynt
1
(North-west) (reply) no, they weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddat <NAAG oi-dhat> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪat] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddyt
1
(North-west) (reply) no, you weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddech <NAAG oi-dhekh> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪɛx] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddych

1 (reply) no, you weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oedden <NAAG oi-dhen> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪɛn] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddynt
1
(reply) no, they weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddet <NAAG oi-dhet> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪɛt] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddyt
1
(reply) no, you weren't

:_______________________________.

++nag oeddwn <NAAG oi-dhun> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪʊn] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddwn
1
(reply) no, I wasn't

:_______________________________.

++nag oes <NAAG-ois> [ˡnɑːg ˡɔɪs] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oes
1
(reply) no, there isn't

:_______________________________.

++nag wyt <NAAG-uit> [ˡnɑːg ˡʊɪt] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac wyt
1
(reply) no, you aren't

:_______________________________.

++nag ydw <NAAG ə-du> [ˡnɑːg əˡdʊ] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac ydwyf

1 (reply) no, I'm not

:_______________________________.

++nag ydi <NAAG ə-di> [ˡnɑːg əˡdɪ] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac ydyw

1 (North) (reply) no, he she it isn't

:_______________________________.

++nag ydych <NAAG ə-dikh> [ˡnɑːg əˡdɪx] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oydh
1
(reply) no, you aren't

:_______________________________.

++nag ydyn <NAAG ə-din> [ˡnɑːg əˡdɪn] (verb)

Informal spelling. The literary form is nac oeddynt

1 (reply) no, they're not

:_______________________________.

++nai, neiaint <NAI, NEI-aint, -ent> [naɪ, ˡnəɪaɪnt, -ɛnt] (masculine noun)
1
nephew

:_______________________________.

++naid <NAID> [naɪd] masculine noun
PLURAL
neidiau <NEID-yai, -ye> [ˡnəɪdjaɪ, -jɛ]
1
jump, leap
rhoi naid take a jump, do a jump (give a jump)
2
(Athletics) jump


gwrthnaid backward jump
hwb, cam a naid triple jump; hop, skip and jump


naid ar herfa running jump
naid cwningen rabbit jump
naid driphlyg triple jump
naid gwrcwd plural: neidiau cwrcwd crouch jump
naid hir long jump
naid stond standing jump
naid uchel high jump
naid wib plural: neidiau gwib running jump

2
jump = copulation
rhoi naid i copulate with;
(1) (of a stallion) cover (the mare)
(2) (of a man) give (a woman) the jump;

3
jump = obstacle to be jumped over

4
(South-east Wales) arch of a bridge
pont pump naid (= pont pum naid) a five arch bridge

5
(Native Laws) measure equal to nine feet

6
ar un naid = in one go

7
ar naid (heraldry) salient = represented as leaping

8
(modifier) leap = having an intercalary day, an extra day inserted in the calendar
blwyddyn naid = leap year
diwrnod naid = leap day, February 29

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British
*nati Cf Latin natre (= to swim)

:_______________________________.

++Naid-y-march <naid ə MARKH> [naɪd ə ˡmarx]
1
hamlet SJ1675 and farm SJ1675 in the county of Sir y Fflint. The English name is Horses Leap.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/browse.php?p=337878 map

ETYMOLOGY: (the) leap (of) the horse (
naid = leap) + (y definite article) + (march = horse)

:_______________________________.

++naiff <NAIF> [naɪf] verb
1
naiff < wnaiff < a wnaiff who will do, who will make; which will do, which will make. Gwnaiff = third person singular of the future of gwneud (= to do)
Pa beth a wnaiff ef? > Be naiff e? What will he do? ((it is) what thing that he will do?)

:_______________________________.

++na'i gilydd <nai GII-lidh> [naɪ giˑlɪ]
1
than others, than other people (than its fellow)
Yn y dre hon y mae yna rai lleoedd sydd yn saffach na'i gilydd i fyw ynddyn nhw
In this town there are some places which are safer to live in than others

rhywun mwy caredig na'i gilydd somebody kinder than other people

:_______________________________.

++naill <NAILH> [ˡnaɪɬ ] (determiner)
1
(South Wales) one of two = having only one remaining
..1/
naill adain = one-winged; in difficulties following the death of a husband or wife
..2/
naill fraich = one-armed
..3/
naill goes = one-legged
..4/
naill lygad = one-eyed

2
one = chosen instead of the other
naill ochr to one side, on one side; away, stored, not in use

3
either = both
naill ochr on either side, on both sides
Sioni naill ochr (1) hypocrite (person who supports two opposing sides); (2) shrimp

4
y naill (+ soft mutation + noun) = the one

5 y naill ddiwrnod ar l y llall day after day (the one day after the other)

6
o'r naill ben i'r llall from one end to the other

o'r naill ben i'r llall i (rywbeth) from one end to the other (of something)

Erbyn hyn daeth angen am faelfa (shop) yn y lle, canys nad oedd yr un yn y cwm o'r naill ben i'r llall iddo Aeron Afan (1855) page 94
Then there came the need for a shop in the place as there wasn't one in the valley from one end to the other

or naill ben ir flwyddyn ir llall from one end of the year to the other, from years end to years end

7 dwyn or naill law i dalur llall to rob Peter to bay Paul (steal from one hand he to pay the other)

8 yn y naill dŷ na'r llall in either house

Ni chawsom wahoddiad i aros dros nos yn y naill dŷ na'r llall
We werent invited to stay overnight in either house

ETYMOLOGY: naill < neill < y neill < yn eill (yn = obsolete form of the definite article) + (form related to all = other, ail = second)

:_______________________________.

++y naill a'r llall NAILH ar LHALL> [ə ˡnaɪɬ ar ˡɬaɬ]
pronoun
1
both of them
Maer naill ar llall wedi gwrthod dod Both have refused to come

2
each of us / you / them

ETYMOLOGY: (
y naill = the one ) + (a = and) + (y llall = the other)

:_______________________________.

++naill adain <nailh AA-dain, -den> [ˡnaɪɬ ˡɑˑdaɪn, -ɛn] adjective
1
one-winged
Used of a man whose wife has died or a woman whose husband has died.

bod yn naill adain be at a real loss, find it hard to live alone, be all alone

Druan fach, naill aden fydd hi nawr, wedi collii gŵr
The poor thing, shell be find it hard now after losing her husband
(Example from Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru / University of Wales Dictionary, tudalen / page 2550)

ETYMOLOGY: (
naill = one (of two)) + (adain = wing)

:_______________________________.

++y naill y llall NAILH ə LHALH> [ə ˡnaɪɬ ə ˡɬaɬ]
pronoun
1
each other
Roeddynt yn cyfarch y naill y llall They were greeting each other

ETYMOLOGY: (
y naill = the one ) + (y llall = the other)

:_______________________________.

++nain, neiniau NAIN, NEIN-yai, -ye [naɪn, ˡnəɪnjaɪ, -jɛ] (feminine noun)
1
(North Wales) grandmother

Diminutive form:
neina <NEI-na [ˡnəɪna] grandma, gran, grannie

 

NOTE: South Wales has mam-gu (cherished mother)

:_______________________________.

++naint <naint> [naɪnt]
1
an old plural form of nant (= valley; stream), nowadays nentydd (= streams).

Occurs in place names.

:_______________________________.

++nam PLURAL namau <NAM,- NA-mai, -me> [nam, ˡnamaɪ, -ɛ] (masculine noun)
1 defect, fault, imperfection, handicap


nam cynhwynol congenital defect
hongian llun dros y nam ar y wal hang a picture over the bad patch on the wall

babanod nam difrifol arnynt babies with serious handicaps

nam ar y lleferydd speech defec; lisp
Mae nam ar 'i leferydd mae e'n dweud eth am es hes got a lisp - he says th instead of s

2 di-nam blameless, faultless; unblemished, pure; honest, true
(di- = privative prefix) + (nam = imperfection)

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British < Celtic
From the same British root: Breton namm


:_______________________________.

++na'm / nam <NAM> [nam]
1
yna + ddim (there + no)

nid oes syndod (literary form) (= it's not surprising)
>
nid oes yna ddim syndod (base colloquial form)
> does na'm syndod (colloquial form)
> s
nam syndod, snam syndod (colloquial form)

(
nid = not) + (oes = is) + (yna = there) + (ddim = no) + (syndod = surprise)

:_______________________________.

 

++namyn <NA-min> [ˡnamɪn] (prep)
1 except for, apart from ENG-Z
Nid oedd sw^n yn unman namyn sw^n y dw^r yn taro ar y creigiau

There was no sound anywhere except the sound of the water hitting the rocks

 

dim manyn... nothing but

Dim namyn rhif yw dyn i bobl y Pencadlys

A person is nothing but a number to the people in the Headquarters/ the Council Offices

 

 

2 (numerals) minus, save, less than
y ganfed namyn un the ninety-ninth (the hundredth less one)


3 (in negative sentence) nothing more than
Pan es i nl ir hen fro yr oedd newid mawr wedi bod. Nid oedd y llyn namyn pwll bach, nar coed mawr namyn ambell goeden bitw ar lan y nant

When I went back to the old home district there had been a great change. The lake was nothing more than a little pool, and the great wood nothing more that a couple of small trees next to the brook.

 

ETYMOLOGY: namyn < namwyn < namoen < (na + moe + na = not / the thing which not + more + than)


:_______________________________.

++Nan <NAN> [nan] NAN (feminine noun)
1
diminutive of the name Ann

:_______________________________.

++nannau <NA-nai, -ne> [ˡnanaɪ, -ɛ]
1
an old plural form of nant (= valley; stream), nowadays nentydd (= streams).

:_______________________________.

++nant (1) <NANT> [nant] masculine noun
PLURAL
nentydd, nantoedd <NEN-tidh, NAN-toidh, -todh > [ˡnɛntɪ, ˡnantɔɪ, ɔ]
Older plurals are
naint, nannau

1 (obsolete) valley. In later times it came to mean stream, and is a feminine noun (probably through its association with afon (= river), a feminine noun). See the entry below.

2
second element (= valley) in some compound forms:

ceunant / crafnant / creignant / crognant / dyfnant / ffinnant
..
..a/
ceunant (m) ravine (ceu- < cau = empty) + (nant = valley);

In the south the form
counant occurs
y ceunant = the deep valley
..

..b/
crafnant the valley of the ramsons / wild garlic; wild-garlic valley
(
craf = ramsons / wild garlic) + (nant = valley)

SH7662
Afon Crafnant river in the county of Conwy, flowing north-east from the reservoir called Llyn Crafnant, and joining the river Conwy north of Trfriw

..
..c/
crognant (m) hanging valley valley produced by glacial erosion which drops steeply into a main valley (crog- < crogi = to hang) + (nant = valley);
y crognant = the hanging valley
..
..d/
dyfnant (m) deep narrow valley, ravine (dyfn- < dwfn = deep) + (nant = valley);
y dyfnant = the deep valley
..
..e/
ffinnant FI-nant[ˡfɪnant] (ffin = boundary) + (nant = stream)
..

..g/
Gwennant Womans name (white stream / brook ) (gwen-, gwenn-, < gwen feminine form of gwyn = white) + (nant = stream) > gwn-nant < gwennant

4
Ffilmiaur Nant (Y Nant films) TV production company located in the town of Caernarfon


Y Nant (the valley) is Nantperis ((the) valley (of) Peris) (nowadays the village of Llanberis, where nant has been confused with llan, a much more usual first element in a settlement name. This is the home village of the founder of the company.

5
Nanmor (< Nntmor < Nntmawr < nant mawr great valley) village by Beddgelert
Dafydd Nanmor a praise bard of the 1400s was from this valley

6 in certain place names, confusion has occurred, and
nant (= valley) has been replaced by llan (= church):

..1/ Llanddewi
Nant Hodni > Nantoddni (= valley of the Hodni / Hoddni river) > Llantoni / Llantoni

..2/ Llanfihangel
Nant Teyrnon > Nant-teyrnon (= valley of Teyrnon) > Llantarnam

..3/
Nant Carfan / Nantcarfan > Llancarfan (= valley of Carfan)

..4/
Nant Garan / Nantgaran (valley of the Garan stream) > Llangaran (> Llangaron?, with the change of a > o which occurs in the final syllable of some words in Welsh, as in medieval Welsh cawad = shower, modern Welsh cawod). Spelt in English Llangarron. This is a village in Herefordshire England, in former Welsh lands west of the Gwy (Wye) river, and is a few miles south-west of Rhosan ar Ŵy (Ross on Wye)

..4/
Nant Peris / Nantperis (= valley of Peris) > Llanberis

..5/
Nant Rhirid / Nantrhirid (= valley of Rhirid) > Llantriddid (on English-language maps as Llantrithyd)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/ST0472 map, the village

Possibly because village names with
nant (= valley) as a first element are not common in Wales, nant occurring mainly as a non-habitative name, there was a tendency to replace it with llan, a much commoner first element in settlement names

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh
nant < British < Celtic

From the same British root:

..1/ Cornish
nans (formerly nant) (= valley) both common in place names in Cornwall (nant in the east, nans in the west).

..2/ Breton
ant (= furrow) (an example of wrong word-division - an nant came to be understood as an ant). In place names, nant (= valley)

In Gaulish too there was a word
nant- (= valley), appearing as an entry nanto, valle in Endlichers Glossary (The Glossary is a Gaulish-Latin wordlist in a manuscript of the 800s, a copy of an earlier work probably from the 500s or 600s. It was compiled by a native of South Gaul, and lists Gaulish words which would have been still in use at the time it was written. The Glossary is preserved in the Austrian National Library.)



(delwedd 7222)

Nanteuil, in south-eastern France, is Gaulish
nant-ial-o valley clearing,

corresponding to Welsh
nant (= (older) valley; (nowadays) stream) and il (= (older) clearing; (later) cultivated upland).

(Had this compound occurred in British and had passed into Welsh it would have been Neintial in modern Welsh)

In the Arpitan language (also called Franco-Provenal) in the Alpine border regions of the states of Italy, France and Switzerland,
nant is apparently still in use as a common noun, as well as being quite frequently found in place names in Arpitania (these Alpine regions where Arpitan is spoken). See the following entry: Welsh nant = stream

NOTE: Obsolete plural forms are
1.
nannau
from
(nant) + (plural suffix au).
Note the change nt- > nnh- > nn- (nant-eu > nan-nheu > nan-neu / nannau)
Compare cant (= one hundred), cannoedd (= hundreds).

See
-nn-

2.
naint, from a Middle Welsh form neint
British (stem nant- + -i) > *neint-i > Welsh neint > naint

:_______________________________.

++nant (2) <NANT> [nant] feminine or masculine noun
PLURAL
nentydd, nantoedd <NAN-toidh, -todh, NAN-tidh> [ˡnantɔɪ, tɔ, ˡnantɪ]
Older plurals are
naint, nannau

1 (feminine noun) stream, brook. In older Welsh, it meant valley, and was a masculine noun. See the entry above. Its feminine gender proabably came about because of the words association with
afon (= river), a feminine word.

Occurs in Cambrian English as nant (the dog was in the nant etc)

Safai Gerddi Gleision ar waelod darn o nant goediog, gysgodol, mewn lle oedd yn llygad haul canol dydd (Melin-y-ddl; William a Myfanwy Eames; 1948; t121)
Gerddi Gleision stood in at the bottom of part of a sheltered wooded stream, in a place which received the midday sun

2 (= stream) second element in some compound forms
..1/
cornant (f) little stream, brook, runlet, small stream (cor- prefix = little)
y gornant = the little stream

..2/
glasnant (f) blue stream
y lasnant = the blue stream

..3/
llednant (f) tributary, feeder (lled- = half)

..4/
mornant (f) (coastline) inlet , creek (mr = sea)
y fornant = the creek

..5/
rhagnant (f) tributary, feeder (rhag- = before)

3
ffinnant boundary stream
(
ffin = boundary, border) + (nant = stream)
House name in Bangor (county of Gwynedd) (in the list of members in The Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion 1961 / Part 1) (spelt Ffinant)

4 Afon Cadnant = name of various streams; strong stream, stream with a strong flow, literally battle-stream

5 Names of houses and streets

Sŵn-y-nant ((the) sound (of) the stream) A street name in
..a/ Pen-coed (county of Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr) (Swn y Nant)
..b/ Gartholwg (county of Rhondda Cynon Taf) (Swn y Nant)
..c/ Penpedairheol (county of Caerffili) (Swn y Nant)
..d/ Creunant (county of Castell-nedd ac Aberafan) (Swn y Nant)
..e/ Trimsaran (county of Trimsaran) (Swn y Nant)
..f/ Cwm-twrch Isaf (county of Powys
(Brycheiniog) (Swn-y-Nant)
..g/ Bryn-coch Uchaf, Yr Wyddgrug (county of Y Fflint) (Swn y Nant)

Sibrwd-y-nant ((the) whispering (of) the stream)
House name in Pont-iets (county of Caerfyrddin)

6
Hafnant summer stream (haf = summer) + (nant = stream)
..a/ (SH8046) stream in Aberconwy (county of Conwy)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/417595 map

..b/ street name in Winsh-wen, Abertawe (county of Abertawe)

7 house name:
Llais y Nant / Llais-y-nant ((the) sound / voice (of) the stream). Also, with the elements reversed, Nantlais (nant = stream)

8 (SJ2850)
Y Nant locality 5km west of Wrecsam, by Coed-poeth (county of Wrecsam). On English-language maps as The Nant. This would seem to be the case of a short name displacing the original full name.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/SJ2850 Y Nant

9
mor sicr 'r nant i'r afon as sure as sure, there can be no doubt about it (as sure as the stream to the river, as sure as a stream flows down into a river)

10
nant (= stream) would seem to be a masculine noun in some place names

Nant Garw (= rough stream, stream where the water flows with great force), rather than *Nant Arw

11 SN5162
Pennant village in Ceredigion pen y nant (the) head (of) the valley > pen-nnt > (stress shift) pn-nant

12 First element in numerous stream names (some of these examples though might be nant = valley, rather than the name of a stream)
Nant Aberbleiddyn, Nant Aberderfel, Nant Adwy'r Llyn, Nant Aman Fach, Nant Arberth, Nant Bachell, Nant y Bachws, Nant Bachwy, Nant Barrog, Nant y Betws, Nant Brn, Nant Brwyn, Nant Brwynog, Nant y Bugail, Nant Caeach, Nant Caedudwg, Nant Carfan, Nant Carn, Nant Cerrig y Gro, Nant Cledlyn, Nant y Coed, Nant Craig y Frn, Nant Creuddyn, Nant Crychell, Nant Crymlyn, Nant Cwm Tywyll, Nant Cwm Pydew, Nant y Cyllyll, Nant Cymrun, Nant Cynnen, Nant Ddu, Nant Derbyniad, Nant yr Eira, Nant Felys, Nant Ffridd Fawr, Nant y Ffrith, Nant Gewyn, Nant Goch, Nant y Graean, Nant y Gro, Nant y Groes, Nant Gwennol, Nant Gwilym, Nant Gwyn, Nant Gwynant, Nant Gyhirych, Nant y Gylchedd, Nant Hafesb, Nant yr Hafod, Nant yr Hengwm, Nant Hesgog, Nant Hir, Nant Islyn, Nant Leidiog, Nant Magwr, Nant Meichiad, Nant Melai, Nant Methan, Nant y Moch, Nant Olwy, Nant y Pandy, Nant Paradwys, Nant Pasgen Bach, Nant Pen y Cnwc, Nant Peris, Nant Pibwr, Nant Rhydwen, Nant Rhyd y Fedw, Nant Rhysfa, Nant Sarffle, Nant y Sarn, Nant y Stabl, Nant Tawelan, Nant Terfyn, Nant Trefil, Nant Treflyn, Nant Trogi, Nant y Waun, Nant Ystradau etc

12
In place names, it can be valley or stream, depending on the history of each name. Some are obviously stream, others obviously valley, but some are doubtful.
Aber-nant, Creignant, Creunant, Crugnant, Glan-y-nant, Hirnant, Min-y-nant, Nannerch, Nant Ffrancon, Nant Gwrtheyrn, Rhuddnant, Trefnant, Trinant

13
Gwl-y-nant view of the stream
(
gwl = view) + (y definite article) + (nant = stream, valley)

NOTE: In Arpitan (or Francoprovenal), a Latinate language spoken in the Alpine region in the border zones of three modern states Italy, France and Switzerland,
nant was originally valley, and the word is still used to this day in the sense, though nowadays it has the sense of stream (or a torrent, or mountainside stream, given the nature of the topography), parallelling the sense development in Welsh.

Gaulish
nant-u / nant-o- (= valley) was taken into Vulgar Latin, which in these regions evolved into modern-day Arpitan.

Place names with nant or derivative forms are abundant for example

..1/
Le Bon Nant, a stream flowing into the Arve in Upper Savoy;

..2/
Le Nantet (little stream) in Annemasse in Upper Savoy;

..3/
Nantbellet (Bellets stream) in Upper Savoy. (Bellet is an Arpitan personal name formed from (bell = fair, good-looking) + (-et diminutive suffix))



(delwedd 7223)

In Geneva, it still has, or had, the sense of valley (nant : Ctait un ravin bois au fond duquel coule un petit ruisseau) (Translation: nant: it was a wooded ravine at the bottom of which a small stream flowed.)

(From Termes Regionaux de Suisse Romande et de Savoie http://henrysuter.ch/glossaires/patoisN0.html#nant ).

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British nant- < Celtic.

The Indo-European root is *
nem-, a curve or slope (Porkorny p.764).

:_______ :_______________________________.

++Nant Conwy <nant-KOO-niu> [nant ˡkoˑnʊɪ]
1 division
(kmmud / cwmwd) of the kntrev (cantref) of Arllechwedd
2
Nantconwy (pre-1974) former rural district in the county of Caernarfon

ETYMOLOGY: (the) valley (of the river) Conwy) (
nant = valley; modern Welsh = stream) + (Conwy river name)
________________________.

++Nantcriba <nant-KRII-ba> [nant ˡkriˑba]
1 farm SJ2301 on Clawdd Offa, north of Trefaldwyn / Montgomery and east of Ffordun / Fordern

2 township (English name: Wropton)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/826795

NOTE: The National Gazetteer (1868)] WROPTON, a township in the parish of Forden, county Montgomery,
3 miles N. of Montgomery.



(delwedd 7414)


ETYMOLOGY:
nant criba < ??nant y criba < ??nant y cribau (the) stream (of) the ridges (nant = stream) + (y definite article) + (cribau, plural of crib = ridge)

Though nant y cribe would be the local form of nant y cribau

:_______________________________.

++Nant Daear Llwynog <nant DEI-ar LHUI-nog> [nant dəɪar ˡɬʊɪnɔg]
1 valley in Dwygyfylchi, through which the fast-flowing Afon Gyrach descends from the moorland

The short form is
Y Nant

Penmaenmawr Historical Society Booklet 1978 on the Penmaenmawr and Dwygyfylchi Website http://www.penmaenmawr.com/historyVillageNames.html

The English name is The Fairy Glen

ETYMOLOGY: nant daear y llwynog (the) valley (of) (the) earth (of) the fox

(
nant = stream) + (daear = earth) + (y definite article) + (llwynog = fox)

The loss of the linking definite article is very common in place names

:_______________________________.

++Y Nant Ddu <ə nant DHII> [ə nant ˡ]
1
stream name in Treharris (Merthyrtudful)

There is a Nant Ddu Terrace SO0605 (which would be
Rhestr y Nant Ddu in Welsh) and nearby, to the north-est, a road called Blackbrook Road (Blackbrook is evidently a translation of the Welsh name), which in Welsh would be Heol y Nant Ddu

2
probably the Welsh name of the stream by Blackbrook House SO4420, Ynysgywraidd / Skenfrith SO4520

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/SO4220

ETYMOLOGY: the black stream (
y definite article) + (nant = stream) + soft mutation + (du = black)

:_______________________________.

++Nant Dyfrgi <nant DƏVR-gi> [nant ˡdəvrgɪ]
1
stream name in Ystradowen, county of Bro Morgannwg

ETYMOLOGY: nant y dyfrgi (the) brook (of) the otter
(
nant = stream) + (y definite article) + (dyfrgi = otter)

:_______________________________.

++Nant Ffrancon <nant-FRANG-kon> [nant ˡfrankɔn] feminine noun
1
SH6363 part of the valley of the Ogwen between Bethesda and Llyn Ogwen (in the county of Gwynedd)
Postal Address: Nant Ffrancon, Bethesda, BANGOR, Gwynedd

2
Tremffrancon name of a street in Bethesda (view (of) (Nant) Ffrancon) (Trem Ffrancon)

:_______________________________.

++Y Nant Garw <ə nant-GAA-ru> [ə nant ˡgɑˑrʊ]
1 A stream name noted by John Hobson Mathews (Mab Cernyw) 'Cardiff Records' (1889-1911)
NANT-GARW (rough brook.) A brook of this name divides the parishes of Leckwith and Caerau.

ETYMOLOGY: y nant garw (the) rough brook
(
y definite article) + (nant = stream) + (garw = rough; probably in the sense of turbulent, fast-flowing)

 

:_______________________________.

++Nantglyn <NANT-glin> [ˡnantglɪn] feminine noun
1
SJ0061 locality the county of Dinbych, 6km south-east of the town of Dinbych

ETYMOLOGY: ?
:_______________________________.

++Nant Helygi <nant-he-LƏ-gi> [nant hɛˡləgɪ] feminine noun

1
SJ1803, near Berriw (Powys)

The English name is Luggy Brook, from a clipped form in Welsh
Nant Lygi

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/553014

:_______________________________.

++nanti nan -ti feminine noun <NAN-ti> [ˡnantɪ]
1
(a vocative form, or used as a title followed by a personal name) auntie
Nanti Jn Auntie Jane
(However, it might be a straight English borrowing, since nauntie exists or has existed in English, where it is mine auntie > nauntie)

 

ETYMOLOGY: nanti < yn anti (= my auntie) (yn, colloquial form of fy = my)

:_______________________________.

++Nantlais nant -lais <NANT-lais> [ˡnantlaɪs]
1
house name

2 street name

..a/ Corntwn (county of Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr) (Nantlais)

..b/ Cwmllynfell (county of Castell-nedd ac Aberafan) (Nantlais)

..c/ Mwynglawdd (county of Wrecsam) (Nantlais)

..d/ Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr (spelt erroneously as Nant Lais, as two words although it is in fact a compound form. The spelling Nant Lais suggests that the stress is on the final element though in fact is is on the penult - and that the meaning is stream (belonging to) (someone called) Lais)

ETYMOLOGY: stream-voice, the sound of the stream
(
nant = stream) + soft mutation + (llais = voice)

:_______________________________.

++Nant-moel <nant-MOIL> [nantˡmɔɪl]
1 Name of a farm south of Mynydd y Glog, north-east of Hirwaun. (county of Rhondda Cynon Taf)
Also:

Nant-moel Uchaf
(farm name) (uchaf = highest, upper)
Cronlyn Nant-moel (name of a reservoir near the farm) (cronlyn = reservoir)

ETYMOLOGY:
Nant-moel (settlement name) < Nant Moel (name of a natural feature) < Nant y Moel

The name is the same as that of
Nant-y-moel (qv), village in the county of Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr

The loss of the linking definite article is common place names

MEANING: Possibly the valley / the stream of the monk
(
nant = stream) + (y = definite article) + (moel = bald man; tonsured man; from the adjective moel = bald, tonsured)

Moel (f) is bare hill but in this name it is a masculine noun.

Compare the corresponding word in Irish:
maol (= devotee of a saint). It occurs in some Irish surnames.

:_______________________________.

++nantoedd <NANT-oidh,-odh> [ˡnantɔɪ, ˡnantɔ]
1
an alternative plural form of nant (= valley; stream), generally nentydd (= streams).

:_______________________________.

++Nant Talwg nant TAA-lug
1
In Y Barri (county of Bro Morgannwg) there is a stream called Nant Talwg. The stream name Talwg is taken from the name of a ford.

Talwg

< Rytalwg (Rhy Talwg)

<
Rytalog (Rhy Talog)

<
Ryd Halog (Rhyd Halog) (= dirty ford / muddy ford)

There is devoicing of
d before h, and the h is lost (d + h) + (t)

..a/ The name occurs in the name of a street Nant Talwg Way, which would be in Welsh
Heol Nant Talwg or simply Nant Talwg / Nant-talwg

..b/
Coed Cwm Talwg name of a wood here

..c/
Cwm Talwg name of a public house here

NOTE: The change
-og > -wg in the south-west is also to be seen in the place names

...a/
Llangatwg > Llangadog (also with a change typical of the south-east - d as the initial consonant of the final syllable > t

..b/ Morgannwg

..c/ Gwynllw^g

Talwg

< Rytalwg (Rhy Talwg)

<
Rytalog (Rhy Talog)

<
Ryd Halog (Rhyd Halog) (= dirty ford / muddy ford)

There is devoicing of
d before h, and the h is lost (d + h) + (t)

:_______________________________.

++Nant-y-caws <nant-ə-KAUS> [nant ə ˡkaʊs]
1
SN4518 locality in the county of Caerfyrddin, 4km east of Caerfyrddin
Nant-y-caws, CAERFYRDDIN, Dyfed

2
SN4518 locality 3km south of Croesoswallt (Oswestry), Anglaterra

ETYMOLOGY: As it stands, this is ((the) stream (of) the cheese)
(
nant = stream) + (y = definite article) + (caws = cheese)

In fact, earlier forms show the final element to be
cawsi (qv) (= causeway)

:_______________________________.

++Nant y Ci <nant ə KII> [nant ə ˡkiː]
1
Stream name, west of Caerfyrddin / Carmarthen, and north-west of Llan-llwch

http://www.geograph.org.uk/browse.php?p=197557 map

Nant-y-ci A farm SN3719 at this place (spelt Nantyci on the Ordnance Survey map)

Maes Sioer Siroedd Unedig, Nant-y-ci The United Couinties Showground, Nant-y-ci

2 Clos Nant y Ci <KLOOS nant ə KII> [ˡkloːs nant ə ˡkiː] Street name in Saron SN6012, west of Rhydaman (Nant y Ci Close)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/68987 map

ETYMOLOGY: ((the) stream (of) the dog)
(
nant = stream) + (y = definite article) + (ci = dog)

:_______________________________.

++Nant-y-ffin <nant-Ə-FIIN> [nant ə ˡfiːn]
1
locality SN5532 in the county of Caerfyrddin, 3km south-west of Abergorlech, on the road to Brechfa

2
street name in Llansamlet (county in Abertawe).
Occurs as Nantyffin South (in Welsh, this would be
Nant-y-ffin Isa) and Nantyffin North (Nant-y-ffin Ucha)

ETYMOLOGY: boundary stream ((the) stream (of) the boundary, the border)
(
nant = stream) + (y definite article) + (ffin = boundary, border)

:_______________________________.

++Nant y Fflint <nant-ə-FLINT> [nant ə ˡflɪnt]
1
(SJ2473) Stream running into the river Dyfrdwy by Y Fflint

ETYMOLOGY: ((the) stream (of) Y Fflint) that is, the stream in the town of Y Fflint
(
nant = stream) + (Y Fflint = town name)

:_______________________________.

++Nantygleisiad <nant-ə-GLEI-shad> [nant ə ˡgləɪʃad]
1
street name in Rhesolfen, (county of Castell-nedd ac Aberafan)

ETYMOLOGY nant y gleisiad ((the) stream (of) the salmon)
(
nant = stream) + (y = definite article) + (gleisiad = young salmon)

Gleisiad is (glas = blue) + (-iad suffix), (the) blue one, i.e. blue fish. In its first year the back of a salmon is bluish in colour.

NOTE: Locally one would expect
gleisiad > glisiad <GLII-shad> [ˡgliˑʃad]
:_______________________________.

++Nant-y-glo <nant-ə-GLOO> [nant ə ˡgloː]
1
village in the county of Blaeanau Gwent

The English name is the poor Welsh spelling Nantyglo.

2 Nanty Glo, Cambrian county, Pennsylvania.

The place so name in the USA has the idiosyncratic spelling Nanty Glo, probably a device to indicate that the stress is on the final element of the name

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanty-Glo,_Pennsylvania#cite_ref-GR1_0-0

ETYMOLOGY ((the) valley (of) the coal or charcoal)
(
nant = valley) + (y = definite article) + (glo = coal or charcoal)

Although the original meaning was probably valley of the coal rather than stream of the coal, part of Nant-y-glo in Blaenau Gwent has the English name Coalbrookvale, which seems to be a translation of a Welsh name Cwm Nant y Glo. Such a Welsh name would suggest that nant has been understood as stream, and that Nant y Glo is the name of the stream flowing down this valley.


If so, the stream probably had another name at one time.

:_______________________________.

++Nant y Milwr <nant ə MII-lur> [nant ə ˡmiˑlʊr]
1
Nant y Milwr (natural feature; elements are written separately). Name of a stream in Craig-cefn-parc (county of Castell-nedd ac Aberafan)

2
Nantymilwr a farm at this place (settlement names are written as one word)

ETYMOLOGY: (the) stream (of) the soldier, the soldiers stream. In such names the singular form could refer to a group hence the stream of the soldiers, soldiers stream)
(
nant = stream) + (y = the) + (milwr = soldier)

Compare
Gwlad y Sais (an old literary name or a jocular name for England the land of the Englishman that is, the land of the Englishmen)

:_______________________________.

++Nantymilwr <nant-ə-MII-lur> [nant ə ˡmiˑlʊr]
1
See Nant y Milwr

:_______________________________.

++Nant-y-moel <nant-ə-MOIL> [nant ə ˡmɔɪl]
1 (SS9392) locality (village) in the county of Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr

Local name
Nant-y-mol <nant-ə-MOOL> [nant ə ˡmoːl]
(1961); population: 3,259; proportion of Welsh-speakers: 19%
(1971) population: 2,685; proportion of Welsh-speakers: 10%

2 A local election ward for this village; it is represented by one seat on the county borough council of Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr

3 The same name (without the linking definite article)
Nant-moel occurs as a farm name south of Mynydd y Glog, north-east of Hirwaun (county of Rhondda Cynon Taf)

Nearby are:
Nant-moel Uchaf (farm name) meaning Upper Nant-moel (uchaf = highest, upper)
Cronlyn Nant-moel (name of a reservoir) (the) Reservoir (at) Nant-moel (cronlyn = reservoir)

ETYMOLOGY: Possibly the valley of the monk (
nant = valley) + (y = definite article) + (moel = bald man; tonsured man; from the adjective moel = bald, tonsured)

Moel (f) is bare hill but in this name it is a masculine noun.

The corresponding word in Irish is the adjective
maol (= bald), which is also used as a noun (= devotee of a saint).

It occurs in some Irish and Scottish names and surnames (Maol Caluim, Malcolm, devotee of saint Columba)

:_______________________________.

++Nant y Pandy <nant ə PAN-di> [nant ə ˡpandɪ]
1
SJ1542 stream on north side of the village of Glyndyfrdwy flowing into the river Dyfrdwy

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/SJ1542

 

2 name of a woodland area in the centre of the town of Llangefni (county of Mn).
English name: The Dingle

 

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/963261

ETYMOLOGY: the stream of the fulling mill
(
nant = valley / stream) + (y = definite article) + (pandy = fulling mill)

NOTE: Non-settlement names are written with the elements separated. Cf
Nantypandy below, where this same name is that of a settlement.

:_______________________________.

++Nantypandy <nant ə PAN-di> [nant ə ˡpandɪ]
1
SH6874 place on south-east side of Llanfairfechan

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/SH6874

ETYMOLOGY: See Nant y Pandy above

NOTE: Settlement names are written as a single word.

Cf. the non-settlement name Nant y Pandy above.

Misspelt however on the O.S. map as Nant y pandy.

:_______________________________.

++Nant y Pysgod <nant ə -skod> [nant ə ˡpəskɔd]
1
stream in Patagonia

ETYMOLOGY: the stream of the fish (i.e. fishes)
(
nant = stream) + (y = definite article) + (pysgod = fish, plural of pysgodyn = a fish)

:_______________________________.

++Nanw <NAA-nu> [ˡnɑˑnʊ] NA nu (feminine noun)
1
diminutive of the name Ann

ETYMOLOGY: Nanw < yn Anw < (f)yn Anw (= my Anw)

Anw = (Ann) + -w (diminutive suffix)

Cf Begw (little Peggie, little Margaret)
:_______________________________.

++napcyn <NAP-kin> [ˡnapkɪn] masculine noun
PLURAL
napcynau <nap--nai, -ne> [napˡkənaɪ, napˡkənɛ]
1
napkin = serviette
2
in the south-west, handkerchief (in the form
macyn poced)

ETYMOLOGY:
Welsh
napcyn is from English napkin (nap = cloth) + (kin = diminutive suffix).
English
nap is from French nape (= tablecloth) < Latin mappa (= cloth, towel)

(a)
Mappa is also the origin of the Welsh word map (= map, i.e. representation on a flat surface of a geographical area)
(Welsh < English
map < French < Latin mappa).

(b) Modern French
nappe (= tablecloth; sheet of ice, oil slick, etc.)

NOTE: in the south the plural form is
napcynon nap--non

:_______________________________.

++nas <NAAS> [ˡnɑːs]
1
which + not + it
which I have not, which you have not, which he has not, which she has not, etc
which I did not, which you did not, which he did not, which she did not, etc
(depends on the tense of the verb)

llyfr nas prynais a book I didnt buy (a book) + (which-not-it) + (I bought)

Nid oedd dim nas gwnai There was nothing he wouldnt do

2
nas + passive form of the verb;
which is not, which are not, which was not, which were not, which has not, etc
(depends on the tense of the verb)

Tn a osodwyd yn barod yn y parlwr ond nas cyneuir oni ddigwydd i rywun pwysig alw
A fire which was set ready in the parlour and which was not lit unless someone important happened to call

nas gwelwyd which has not been seen, unseen
Gwen John nas gwelwyd name of an exhibition September 1997, Caer-dydd = the unseen Gwen John, the Gwen John never before seen)

nas gwerthwyd unsold, which has / have not been sold;
(Commerce)
pethau nas gwerthwyd returns, unsold goods which have been returned

ETYMOLOGY: form of
na (relative pronoun = which + not) + (suffix -s representing a direct object equivalent to English him / her / it)

:_______________________________.

++nash <NASH> [naʃ] masculine noun

1 in the English phrase of opprobium Welsh nash (Welsh nationalist)

07 04 2005 a forum gives an example of its use in English
Speak English you Welsh nash bastard. A comment (mistakes corrected) on how one might react to this was:

Croeso i unrhyw un falw i'n Welsh Nash. Dw in cofio Plaid Cymru yn gwerthu mygiau te gyda 'Nashi' wedi sgwennu ar yr ochr.
Anyones welcome to call me a Welsh Nash. I remember Plaid Cymru selling tea mugs with Nashi written on the side.

See
nashi below
:_______________________________.

++nashi <NA-shi> [ˡnaʃɪ] masculine noun
PLURAL
nashis <NA-shis> [ˡnaʃɪs]
1
A term of contempt in English for Welsh nationalists used by Welsh-speaking Welsh people whose allegiance is to England, or certain English people. Used ironically in Welsh by supporters of Welsh independence.

Rywsut, fedra i ddim dychmygu Tori rhonc fel yntau (nac unrhyw Lafurwr Prydeinig arall) yn penodi mab i nashi i swydd mor bwysig
Somehow I cant imagine a fervent Tory like himself (or any British Labour politician) appointing the son of a Nashi to such an important job

Nid rhyw fath o nashi yw e, er ei fod yn un or Llafurwyr prin sydd yn gefnogol ir iaith Gymraeg

Hes not some sort of Nashi, even though hes one of the few Labour politicians who support the Welsh language

Mae'n debyg mod i wedi bod yn dipyn o Nashi ers blynyddoedd
It would seem that Ive been a bit of a Nashi for a number of years

ETYMOLOGY: (English
nash = nationalist) + (-i diminutive suffix)
From Welsh Nash as a term of oppropium or derision used in English by the pro-English in Wales (whether Welsh, English-Welsh or incomers from England or other countries).

Nash is the first syllable of the English word nationalist <NA-shə-nə-list> [ˡnaʃənəlɪst]
:_______________________________.

++nath <NAATH> [nɑː θ] verb
1 Southern form of gwnaeth / wnaeth (= he / she / it did; he / she / it made

Usually spelt (less correctly) nath / nth

See aa / gwnaath / naath

:_______________________________.

++natred <NA-tred> [ˡnatrɛd]
1
a regional form of nadroedd (= snakes).
See
neidr
craf y natred (Allium scorodoprasum) (plant name) Sand leek (garlic of the snakes)

:_______________________________.

++natur <NA-tir> [ˡnatɪr] (feminine noun)
1
nature = whole system of existence beyond the control of man
gadael i natur ddilyn ei chwrs let nature take its / her course (leave to nature following its course)

byd natur the natural world (world (of) nature)
:_______________________________.

++naturiol <na-TIR-yol> [naˡtɪrjɔl] (adj)
1
natural
Y peth mwyaf naturiol ar y ddaear iddi oedd ceisio helpu mewn argyfwng
It was the most natural thing in the world for her to try and help in a crisis

:_______________________________.

++nau <NAI> [naɪ] numeral
1
nasal mutation of dau = two
fy nau fab = my two sons

:_______________________________.

++naw <NAU> [naʊ] (masculine noun)
1
nine
2
bod naw byw cath yn (rhywun) be like a cat and have nine lives, have the nine lives of a cat (be nine lives (of a) cat in someone)

Roedd naw byw cath yn y bachan hwnnw - dianc chroen cyfan o bob batl wnaeth e
He had the nine lives of a cat - he escaped without a scratch from every battle

:_______________________________.

++nawdd-dy NAUDH-di [ˡnaʊˡdɪ] masculine noun
PLURAL
nawdd-dai NAUDH-dai [ˡnaʊˡdaɪ]

1 shelter, refuge, hostel, home

(Columbus Ohio)
y talaethdy mawr, lle y cyferfydd deddfwrfa Ohio, y carchardy talaethol, y nawdd-dai rhagorol i fyddariaid, mudion, deillion, a gwallgofiaid
(Dros Gyfanfor a Chyfandir: Sef Hanes Taith o Gymru at Lanau y Mr Tawelog ac yn l, Trwy brif Daleithau a Thiriogaethau yr Undeb Americanaidd.William Davies Evans,1883)
The large state house, where the Ohio legislature meets, the state prison, the splendid home for the deaf, dumb and blind, and lunatics

:_______________________________.

++nawddsant, nawddseintiau <NAUDH-sant, naudh-SEINT-yai, -ye> [ˡnaʊsant,naʊˡsəɪntjaɪ, -ɛ] (masculine noun)
1
patron saint

Mae San Sir yn nawddsant sawl gwlad Saint George is the patron saint of many countries

Dwynwen yw nawddsant cariadon Cymru Dwynwen is the patron saint of Welsh lovers

Bydd cinio arbennig yn y neuadd yr wythnos nesaf i ddathlu dydd ein nawddsant There will be a specail dinner in the hall next week to celebrate the day of our patron saint

:_______________________________.

++nawfed <NAU-ved> [ˡnaʊvɛd] (adjective)
1
ninth

2
y nawfed ton the ninth wave, supposed traditionally to be bigger and stronger than the preceding or following eight

Yn l chwedloniaeth y Gwyddel maer nawfed ton yn ffin rhwng y byd hwn ar Arallfyd
According to Irish mythology the ninth wave is the boundary between this world and the Otherworld

3
y nawfed ach the ninth degree of kinship, the ninth remove, the ninth degree of consanguinity, nine generations back from the present one

Dw i ddim yn perthyn iddo hyd yn oed yn y nawfed ach - I'm not even remotely related to him (Im not related to him even in the ninth degree)
Dyw e ddim yn perthyn iddi or nawfed ach I'm not remotely related to her (hes not related to her from the ninth degree)

olthain ei dras hyd y nawfed ach to trace his descent to nine generations back

:_______________________________.

++nawn <NAUN> [ˡnaʊn] masculine noun
PLURAL
<NOO-nai, -ne> [ˡnoˑnaɪ, -ɛ]

1
obsolete nones = ninth hour of the day, around 15.00

2
obsolete nones = a daily religious service held originally at the ninth hour (15.00), later changed to midday (12.00, the sixth hour)

3
midday, noon
nawn y dydd hwnnw (adverbial phrase) on the noon of that day, at noon on that day

4
prydnawn (prynhwn, pnawn) afternoon 12.00 - 18.00
time of the nones (
pryd = time, period) + (nawn = the nones)

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British < Latin
nna hra = the ninth hour (in a monastery), the nones, three in the afternoon - originally the ninth hour after sunrise

:_______________________________.

++naw naw naw <nau-nau-NAU> [naʊ naʊ ˡnaʊ]
1
nine-nine-nine - the telephone number for calling free of charge the emergency services in the countries of Britain police, ambulance, fire department, coastguard
Ffonia naw naw naw! Dial nine-nine-nine!

:_______________________________.

++nawnddydd <NAUN-dhidh> [ˡnaʊnɪ] masculine noun
1
literary afternoon; evening

2
literary
nawnddydd einioes one's final years, evening of one's life, evening of one's years (evening (of) life)
Nis gellid dymuno lle tawelach i dreulio nawnddydd einioes na'r Slendai (= elusendai)
A quieter place than the Almshouses to spend the evening of one's years could not be wished for

ETYMOLOGY: (
nawn = midday, afternoon, three in the afternoon) + soft mutation + (dydd = day)

:_______________________________.

++nawnlin <NAUN-lin> [ˡnaʊnlɪn] feminine noun
PLURAL
nawnliniau <naun-LIN-yai, -ye> [ˡnaʊnlɪnjaɪ, -ɛ]
1
meridian

ETYMOLOGY: noon line (
nawn = noon, midday) + soft mutation + (llin = line)

:_______________________________.

++nawr <NAUR> [naʊr] (adverb)
1
now
2
Nawr neu ddim! Now or never!

:_______________________________.

++naws <NAUS> [naʊs] (feminine or masculine noun)
1
nature, disposition, temperament
2
naws drist iddo tinged with sadness (with a sad nature / touch to it)

:_______________________________.

++nawsaerydd PLURAL nawsaeryddion <naus-EI-ridh, naus-ei-RƏDH-yon> [naʊsˡəɪrɪ, naʊsəɪˡrəjɔn] (masculine noun)
1
air conditioner

:_______________________________.

++-nd-
British nd > Welsh nn (medial position) (that is , a double letter)

British nd > Welsh nn > n (final position) (that is , a single letter)

land- > llann > llan (originally = land, ground; later = enclosure; ecclesiastical ground, church); plural llannau
lond- > llonn > llon (= cheerful); llonni (= cheer up)

:_______________________________.

++ndach <ƏN-dakh> [ˡəndax] (verb) (North-west)
1
yes, you are

:_______________________________.

++ndan <ƏN-dan> [ˡəndan] (verb) (North-west)
1
yes, we are

:_______________________________.

++ndech <ƏN-dekh> [ˡəndɛx] (verb) (North-east)
1
yes, you are

:_______________________________.

++nden <ƏN-den> [ˡəndɛn] (verb) (North-east)
1
yes, we are

:_______________________________.

++ndw <ƏN-du> [ˡəndʊ] (verb) (North Wales)
1
yes, I am

:_______________________________.

++ndi <ƏN-di> [ˡəndɪ] (verb) (North Wales)
1
yes, he is; yes, she is; yes, it is

The 3rd [person] singular ydiw was so written up to the 16th century; and rhymes with words in -iw, as friw, diw D. G. (= Dafydd ap Gwilym (North Cardiganshire), floruit 1350-80, reference [is] to Barddoniaeth Dafydd ap Gwilym Llundain, 1789) 35 cf. 119, 144, 193, etc. and G. (= Gwalchmai, Anglesey. Floruit 1150-90) 186, 193, 203, 206, 235, 247, also with yw (= iw); see paragraph 77 v. The Late Modern ydyw is an etymological spelling, and is read diw, except by a few affected persons. The Noerth Wales dialect form is di (and, in answering questions only, ndi, a curious attempt to sound y with the tongue in the d position). South Wales dialect, in questions and answers, di.



(delwedd 7261)

:_______________________________.

++ndyn <ƏN-din> [ˡəndɪn] (verb) (North Wales)
1
yes, they are

:_______________________________.

++neb <NEEB> [neːb] NEEB (pronoun)
1
nobody

2
fawr neb hardly anyone
Ddaeth fawr neb hardly anybody came
Fu yno fawr neb ddoe there was hardly anybody there yesterday

3
Ni ddaw i neb ddoe yn l You cant undo the past, whats done is done (yesterday wont come back to anybody)

4 anybody, any person
Nid di-fai neb a aned No-one's perfect ((it is) not without fault anyone who was born)

5
y neb sydd... whoever is...
Y neb syn byw mewn tŷ gwydr gocheled luchio cerrig

People who live in glass houses shouldnt throw stones
(the person who lives in a glass house let-him-take-care-not-to throw stones)

6
neb ohonynt (person) none of them
Ni siaradodd neb ohonynt None of them spoke

7
neb na dim anybody or anything, nobody or nothing
Dydi on malio am neb na ddim He doesnt care for anybody or anything

8 neb amgen na none other than
neb llai na none other than

 

9 as the first element in some old compounds: nemor (neb + mawr) (= hardly any), nepell (neb + pell) (= not far),

:_______________________________.

++Nebuchodonosor <ne-bu-kho-do-NO-sor> [nɛbʊxɔdɔnɔˡsɔr] 1 Nebuchadnezzar [nɛ-bjʊ-kəd-ˡnɛ-zə] = 605-562 BC, a king of Babylon. He conquered Jerusalem and destroyed the city, and forced the Jews into exile in Babylon
Nebuchodonosor brenin Babilon Nebuchadnezzar

Brenhinoedd-2 25:1
Ac yn y nawfed flwyddyn o'i deyrnasiad ef, yn y degfed mis, ar y degfed dydd o'r mis, y daeth Nebuchodonosor brenin Babilon, efe a'i holl lu, yn erbyn Jerwsalem, ac a wersyllodd yn ei herbyn hi, a hwy a adeilasant yn ei herbyn hi wrthglawdd o'i hamgylch hi. (25:2) A bu y ddinas yng ngwarchae hyd yr unfed flwyddyn ar ddeg i'r brenin Sedeceia
Kings-2 25:1 And it came to pass in the ninth year of his reign, in the tenth month, in the tenth day of the month, that Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came, he, and all his host, against Jerusalem, and pitched against it: and they built forts against it round about. (25:2) And the city was besieged unto the eleventh year of king Zedekiah.

Daniel 1:1 Yn y drydedd flwyddyn o deyrnasiad Jehoiacim brenin Jwda, y daeth Nebuchodonosor brenin Babilon i Jerwsalem, ac a warchaeodd arni.
Daniel 1:1 In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah came Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon unto Jerusalem, and besieged it.

:_______________________________.

++nebwr <NEE-bur> [ˡneˑbʊr] (m)
PLURAL
nebwyr <NEB-wir> [[ˡnɛbwɪr]
1
(south-east Wales) good-for-nothing, neer-do-well

 

ETYMOLOGY: (neb = nobody) + soft mutation + (gŵr = man)

 

:_______________________________.

++nechrau <NEKH-re> [ˡnɛxˡraɪ, -ɛ]
1
form with nasal mutation of dechrau = (noun) beginning
yn nechraur ail ganrif ar bymtheg
at the beginning of the seventeeth century

:_______________________________.

++nedd <NEEDH> [neː]
1
nits. See nedden


:_______________________________.

++Nedd <NEEDH> [neː] feminine noun
1
SN9111 Afon Nedd = river in the county of Castell-nedd ac Aberafan

The same river name is found in former British territories in England and Scotland, and in Cornwall:


(delwedd 7474)

.....(1) (SE5157) Nidd = river in the county of North Yorkshire, England (and Nidderdale, a name of Scandinavian origin incorporating the river name Nidd = valley of the river Nidd)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/199824 SE4846 River Nidd

.....(2) (NY0057) Nith = river in Scotland (Strathclyde, Dumfries and Galloway)

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/533026 NX8795 River Nith at Thornhill

.....(3)
Nedh (English: River Neet) a river in Cornwall, near the border with England.
Also in the name of a village on this river: Cornish name:
Stras-nedh SS2206

(English name: Stratton) ystrad Nedd

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/428414 SS2103 River Neet at Helebridge


(delwedd 4707)

2
Nedd Fechan (little Nedd) stream which flows into the Nedd river
Pontneddfechan (bridge over the Nedd Fechan) village in Powys SN9107

3
Glyn Nedd the valley of the river Nedd
Glyn-nedd name of a village in this valley

4
a division (cwmwd) of the medieval territory called Gwrinydd
Castell-nedd (castle in the territory of Nedd) town by the river Nedd.
The English name is Neath

Cf. other English names where a district name is used for the main settlement
a) Brecon for the town of Aberhonddu, the main town in the territory of Brycheiniog
b) Builth, which in Victorian times was renamed Builth Wells, for Llanfair ym Muallt, the main town in the territory of Buellt.

c) Chirk for Y Waun, from district name (Glyn)Ceiriog

Fan Nedd name of mountain summit (the summit in the territory of Nedd)

Mynachlog Nedd name of an abbey in the town of Castell-nedd (the monastery in the territory of Nedd)
Mynachlog-nedd village by the abbey, now part of the town of Castell-nedd (settlement names are spelt as a single word)

Also the spurious name
Abaty-nedd, wrongly for Mynachlog-nedd which is known as Neath Abbey in English. Abaty-nedd is a direct translation of the English name.

ETYMOLOGY: ??

:_______________________________.

++nedda <NEE-dha> [ˡneˑa] feminine noun
1
(North-west) Form of
neddau (= adze)

:_______________________________.

++neddai <NEE-dhai, -dhe> [ˡneˑaɪ, -ɛ] feminine noun
1
See
neddau = adze

:_______________________________.

++neddau <NEE-dhai, -dhe> [ˡneˑaɪ, -ɛ] feminine noun
PLURAL
neddyfau <ne-DHƏ-vai, -ve> [nɛˡəvaɪ, -ɛ]
1
(American: adz) (Englandic: adze) kind of axe for dressing timber

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British
From the same British root: Breton
neze

NOTE: There is a variant form
neddyf, nowadays a literary word. From neddyf the word used in the county of Penfro comes: nife (showing metathesis the probable path is
(a)
neddyf > nefydd (DD-F) > (F-DD)
(b)
nifedd (E- I) > (I-E)
(c)
nife (loss of final dd).

North-west Wales:
nedda < neddau (in this region au in a final syllable becomes a)
North-east Wales:
nedde < neddau (in this region au in a final syllable becomes e)

As for the endings
-au, -yf (neddau, neddyf) compare the two forms for sword cleddau, cleddyf.

This word
neddau (= adze) is related to a similar word in Welsh: naddu (= to carve)
:_______________________________.

++nedde <NEE-dhe> [ˡneˑɛ] feminine noun
1
(North-east) Form of
neddau = adze

:_______________________________.

++nedden <NEE-dhen > [ˡneˑɛn] feminine noun
PLURAL
nedd needh <NEEDH> [neː]
1
nit = egg of a head louse

2 nit = young hatched head louse

 

Head louse is lleuen, llai. In English, at least, to avoid ambiguity in the meaning of nit, some specialists recommend that nit be restricted to the the hatched and empty egg shell; the developing embryonated egg as an should be referred to as such, egg; and the hatched insect as a (head) louse. (See wikipedia, Head louse.)

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British < Celtic *snid
Irish has
sniodh

From the same British root: Breton nezenn, nez (= nit),

 

:_______________________________.

++neddog <NE-dhog> [ˡneˑɔg] feminine noun
1
full of nits, nit-infested

 

ETYMOLOGY: (nedd = nits) + (-og suffix for forming adjectives)

 

:_______________________________.

++neddyf <NE-dhiv> [ˡneˑɪv] feminine noun
1
See
neddau = adze

:_______________________________.

++neddyfau <ne-DHƏ-vai, -ve> [nɛˡəvaɪ, -ɛ] feminine noun
1
Plural form of
neddau = adze

:_______________________________.

++nef, nefoedd <NEEV, NEE-voidh, -vodh> [neːv, ˡneˑvɔɪ, ˡneˑvɔ] (feminine noun)
1
heaven

:_______________________________.

++nefoedd <NEE-voidh, -vodh> [ˡneˑvɔɪ, ˡneˑvɔ] (feminine noun)
1
(a plural form, from nef, but regarded as singular) heaven

:_______________________________.

++nefol <NEE-vol> [ˡneˑvɔl] adjective
1
heavenly
2
y llu nefol the Heavenly Host = the angels, a group of angels
3 y wledd nefol heavenly bliss (the heavenly feast)

ETYMOLOGY: (
nef = heaven) + (-ol suffix for forming adjectives)

:_______________________________.

++neges, negesau <NEE-ges, ne-GE-sai, -se> [neˑgɛs, nɛˡgɛsaɪ, -ɛ] (feminine noun)
1
message
gwas negesau = errand boy, messenger

2
object of an errand
or trip to a shop; shopping
hel eich neges o siop y pentref
buy things in the village shop (gather your shopping)

3
dod at eich neges come to the point (come to your message)
Der at dy neges! Come to the point!

:_______________________________.

++nei <NEI> [nəɪ] (verb)
1
a colloquial form of
wnei, soft mutated form of gwnei (= you will do)

Beth a wnei di yfory? > Be nei di fory? What will you do tomorrow?

:_______________________________.

++neidio <NEID-yo> [ˡnəɪdjɔ] (verb)
1
to jump

2
(North Wales)
neidior ciw push in (in a queue), jump a queue, jump the queue
(in the South
tsheto'r gwt) (cheat the queue)

3
neidio ar eich traed jump to your feet

4
neidio ar y cyfle jump at the chance = seize the opportunity enthusiastically
neidio ar y cyfle i (wneud rhywbeth) jump at the chance (to do something)

5
Wedi neidio rhy hwyr peidio Look before you leap (after jumping too late not (to jump))

6 neidio i'r adwy come to the rescue (jump into the breech)

ETYMOLOGY: (
neid-i- stem of neidio = to jump) + (-o suffix for forming verbs)

:_______________________________.

++neidiol <NEID-yol> [ˡnəɪdjɔl] adjective
1
jumping, leaping
ysgyfarnog neidiol jumping hare or spring hare; a large South African and East African leaping rodent. Full name: Cape jumping hare. Not a true hare. The Afrikaans name is springhaas. Scientific name: Pedetes cater.

ETYMOLOGY: (
neid-i- stem of neidio = to jump) + (-ol suffix for forming adjectives)

:_______________________________.

++neidr (neidir) <NEI-dir> [ˡnəɪdɪr]
PLURAL
nadroedd, nadredd <NA-droidh, -drodh, -dredh> [ˡnadrɔɪ, ˡnadrɔ, ˡnadrɛ]
1
snake, serpent

2
snake = doublecrosser
Dw i am ladd y neidr yna Im going to kill / I want to kill (I am for killing) that doublecrosser

3
spiteful woman
En nidir oodd i wraig a, yn allws i gwenwn ar bawb
(Geiriadur y Brifysgol, tudalen 2565, here with altered spelling)
Standard Welsh:
Hen neidr oedd ei wraig ef, yn arllwys ei gwenwyn ar bawb
His wife was a spiteful old thing, always talking badly of everybody / running down everybody
((it is) (an) old snake that-was his wife of-him, pouring her poison on everybody)

4
(insult)
yr hen neidr i chi you basttard (the old snake to you, youre an old snake)

5
swynwr nadroedd snake charmer (charmer / enchanter (of) snakes)

6
yn fyw o nadroedd snake infested (alive of / with snakes)

7
croen neidr PLURAL crwyn nadroedd snakeskin
esgid groen neidr (f), esgidiau croen neidr snakeskin shoe
bg croen neidr (m), bagiau croen neidr snakeskin bag

8
neidr gudd snake in the grass, treacherous person (hidden snake / serpent)

9
servant = animal in the service of another animal, in certain animal names
gwas y neidr ((the) servant (of) the snake) dragonfly

10
gm neidr game of snakes and ladders ((the) game (of) snakes)

11
bod wrthi fel petai'n lladd nadroedd, be going at it all out, be sweating ones guts out (from great effort), be at it hammer and tongs (be at it as if he were killing snakes)

Also:
bod wrthi fel lladd nadroedd (be at it like killing snakes)

mynd ati fel lladd nadroedd
set to it with a vengeance (go to it like killing snakes)

12
(South Wales)
coc y neidr (plant name) (Arum maculatum) lords and ladies, cuckoo pint. Literally snakes penis, (the) penis (of) the snake)

13
craf y nadroedd (Allium scorodoprasum) Sand leek (garlic of the snakes)
craf y natred (Allium scorodoprasum) Sand leek (garlic of the snakes)

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh < British < Celtic < Indoeuropean
*ntr

In the two other British-Celtic languages: Cornish
nadr (= snake), Breton naer (= snake) < nazer
In Hibernian-Celtic: Irish
nathair (= snake)

Cf. English
adder. This comes from the wrong division of the word after the indefinite article: an adder < a nadder. The English word can be seen to be cognate with the Welsh word, having had originally the initial n of the Indo-European source word.

NOTE: North-west:
neidar <NEI-dar> [ˡnəɪdar] < neider
South-east:
nidir <NII-dir> [ˡniˑdɪr]

:_______________________________.

++neilltu <NEILH-ti> [ˡnəɪɬtɪ]
1
one side
gosod ychydig or neilltu ar gyfer tymor glawog save a little for a rainy day (put a bit aside for a rainy season)
:_______________________________.

++neilltuol <neilh-TII-ol> [ˡnəɪɬˡtiˑɔl]
1
special
enghraifft neilltuol an isolated example

2 ad hoc
pwyllgor neilltuol an ad hoc committee

3 specific
gwybodaeth neilltuol specific knowledge
ddydd Gwener neilltuol ym Mai 1887 on one specific Friday in May 1887

4
yn neilltuol especially, in particular
dau fechgyn or pentref, yn neilltuol mab Sin Williams Tyn-y-waun
two boys from the village, especially the son of Sin Williams of Tyn-y-waun

:_______________________________.

++neilltuolrwydd <neilh-ti-OL-ruidh> [nəɪɬtɪˡɔlrʊɪ]
1
peculiarity

ETYMOLOGY: (
neilltuol = particular) + (-rwydd suffix for forming abstract nouns)

:_______________________________.

++neina <NEI-na [ˡnəɪna] (feminine noun)
1
(North Wales) Diminutive form of
nain (= grandmother); grandma, gran, grannie

ETYMOLOGY: (nein-, penult form of nain = grandmother) + (-a diminutive suffix)

:_______________________________.

++neiniau <NEIN-yai, -ye> [ˡnəɪnjaɪ, -ɛ] plural
1
grandmother; plural of nain = grandmother

:_______________________________.

++neintio <NEIN-tyo> [ˡnəɪntjɔ] verb
1
(district of Meirionnydd, in the county of Gwynedd) neintio is a form (with the loss of the first syllable) of eneintio, a variant of eneinio (= to anoint)

:_______________________________.

++Neirin <NEI-rin> [ˡnəɪrɪn] masculine noun
1
a form of the name Aneirin, with the loss of the first syllable

:_______________________________.

++neis <NEIS> [nəɪs] adjective
1
nice = (person) kind, sympathetic

Roedd hynnyn neis iawn ynddi It was very nice of her

Dyw e ddim mor neis hynna Hes not as nice as that

Ma nhw wedi bod yn neis iawn wrtho i. O, odyn
Theyve been really nice to me. They really have

2
nice = pleasant
Maen neis gweld y plant yn mwynhu fel hyn
Its nice to see the kids enjoying themselves like this

3
nice = attractive
bocs wedi ei lapio mewn papur neis
a box wrapped in nice paper

4
nice, pleasant = tasty
Maer sierin rhoi blas neis ir uwd, wyddoch
The sherry gives the porridge a nice taste, see

5
South-east Wales fussy, finnicky (about food)

6
Neis cwrdd chi = Nice to meet you

7
neis neis overnice, genteel = trying to be pleasing to everybody, inoffensive
Nid theatr ywr dramu neis neis yma
These overnice plays are not theatre, are not what theatre is all about

ETYMOLOGY: English
nice (= pleasant) (originally = fine, precise) < French nice (= stupid) < Latin nescius (= ignorant)

:_______________________________.

++neisied, neisedi <NEI-shed, nei-SHEE-di> [ˡnəɪʃɛd, nəɪˡʃeˑdɪ] (feminine noun)
1
handkerchief
neisied boc pocket handkerchief

South-east:
nishad [ˡnɪʃad]

:_______________________________.

++neithiwr <NEITH-yur> [ˡnəɪθjʊr] (adverb)
1
last night

:_______________________________.

++Nel <NEL> [nɛl] (feminine noun)
1
woman's name - diminutive of
Elen

:_______________________________.

++nelo <NEE-lo> [ˡneˑlɔ]
1
nelo < a wnelo (= which might do)
This is (
a = which) + soft mutation + (gwnelo = might do, third person present subjunctive form of gwneud = make, do)

Does nelo hynny dim byd ... thats got nothing to do with (there isnt / which might do / that / nothing / (in the) world / with

Beth sydd a nelo moron gweld yn y tywyllwch? What is the connection between carrots and seeing in the dark?

:_______________________________.

++nelof <NEE-lov> [ˡneˑlɔv]
1
nelof < a wnelwyf (= which I might do)

This is (
a = which) + soft mutation + (gwnelwyf = I might do, first person present subjunctive form of gwneud = make, do)
Does nelof fi ddim r peth > Does nelo i ddim r peth Ive got nothing to do with the thing (there isnt / which might do / I / anything / with the / thing)

:_______________________________.

++Nelw <NEE-lu> [ˡneˑlʊ] (feminine noun)
1
woman's name - diminutive of
Elen

:_______________________________.

 

++nemor <NE-mor> [ˡnɛmɔr]
1
not much, not many; hardly any

 

2 nemor ddim <NE-mor DHIM> [ˡnɛmɔr ˡɪm] hardly anything, hardly anything at all, not much at all, next to nothing

Nid oes ganddo nemor ddim dylanwad He has hardly any influence

 

Nid oes ganddo nemor ddim diddordeb mewn gwleidyddiaeth

He had hardly any interest in politics

 

Aeth y misoedd heibio heb nemor ddim i dorri ar yr undonedd

The months went by with hardly anything to break the monotony

 

Gwyddwn i nemor ddum am y clefyd cyn hynny

I knew next to nothing about the disease before that

 

Ni wyddys nemor ddim am ei dad

Little is known of his father

 

3 with the preposition o (= of)

Cyn pen nemawr o wythnosau before many weeks had passed ((before (the) end (of) not-many (of) weeks)

 

4 nemor byth hardly ever

Colled fawr i bob eglwys yw marwolaeth ei ffyddloniaid... Chwith iawn fydd gweled lle'r ddau yn wg yn y capel mwy. Eisteddent ochr yn ochr o dan y pulpud yn y st fawr yn wynebu'r dorf... Nemor byth y cafwyd eu lle yn wg...
The death of members is a great loss to every chapel... It'll be very sad to see the places of these two members empty from now on. They used to sit side by side below the pulpit facing the congregation... Their place was hardly ever empty (they were hardly ever absent)
Cofiant a Gweithiau y Parchedig David Silyn Evans, Gweinidog Eglwys Siloa, Aberdar. Ap Hefin (Henry Lloyd) / Aber-dr / 1937 t158

 

5 ni + nemor gwell not much better

Mynodd y gweinidog gael pob gohebiaeth yn Saeseng, er nad oedd yr un o aelodaur capel yn deall Saesneg, a chafodd wedyn nad oedd y Parchedig ei hun nemawr gwell

The minister insisted on having all correspondence in English, although none of the members of the chapel understood English, and later it transpired that the minister himself was not much better

 

6 ni + nemor un hardly any one, hardly a single one
(South-east:
nymor un / 'ymor un; north-west nemawr un)

Toes na nemawr un rwan i chi Theres hardly a single one for you now

 

With the preposition o (= of):

Nid oes nemor un or llyfrau hyn yn sn am famiaith y gwyddonydd

Hardly any of these books mention the scientists mother language

 

6 ni + nemor neb hardly anybody

Ni fu nemor neb yn gwrthod arwyddor ddeiseb

hardly anybody refused to sign the petition

 

ETYMOLOGY: Welsh nemor < nemawr < nemmawr < britnic

Equivalent to nebmawr (neb + mawr) (neb = not (anybody), not (anything)) + (mawr = great, big)
From the same British root: Cornish
nemeur, Breton nemeur (= not much, mot many)
Irish has a similar item: nach mr (= almost)

 

NOTE: North-west nemawr, south-east nymor

 

:_______________________________.

++nenfwd, nenfydau <NEN-vud, nen-VƏ-dai, -de> [ˡnɛnvʊd, nɛnˡvədaɪ, -ɛ] (masculine noun)
1
ceiling

:_______________________________.

++neno <NEE-no> [ˡneˑnɔ]
1
In oaths, colloquial form of yn enw in (the) name (of)

nenor iechyd in the name of salvation! in the name of redemption!

(
iechyd = health; (Christianity) salvation, redemption)

:_______________________________.

++nentydd <NEN-tidh> [ˡnɛntɪ] (plural noun)
1
streams; see
nant

:_______________________________.

++nr <NEER> [neːr] (plural noun)

1
lord, chief

2 Nerɥs <NEE-ris> [ˡneˑrɪs]

Female name lady, female ruler
(a modern coining)
nr (= lord, chief) + (-ys suffix use in creating female names)

ETYMOLOGY: Indo-European root:

Cf The Welsh word nerth (= strength), and Irish neart (= strength) < Celtic nert-o-

Cf Greek anir (= man), Alexandros protector of man i.e. protector of men

(
alex = protector, defender < alexein = to ward off, protect, to defend) + andros (anir = man, andros = of man).

Cf Sanskrit
nar- (= man)

Cf Latin
nerisus (= firm), and the personal name Ner

:_______________________________.

++ner-

1
first syllable in apheretic forms with an original hanner (= half)

The pretonic first syllable is frequently dropped in spoken Welsh, hence haner- > ner-


..1/
nerco < hanerco < hanercof (halfwit, fool)
(half [a] mind) (
haner- < hanner = half) + (cof = mind)

..2/
nereg < hanereg (half acre)
(
haner- < hanner = half) + (-eg suffix)

..3/
nerob < hanerob (flitch of bacon, side of bacon salted to preserve it)
(half [a] pig) (
haner- < hanner = half) + (hob = pig)

..4/
herpan / nherpan / nerpan < hanrpan < hanner pan
(expression referring to the preparation of cloth: half fulled, not sufficiently prepared)
(half fulled) (
pan = fulled; it is the stem of pannu = to full)

:_______________________________.

++nerco <NER-ko> [ˡnɛrkɔ]
1
(noun) halfwit, (adjective) halfwitted. See hanercof

:_______________________________.

++nereg <NEE-reg> [ˡneˑrɛg] feminine noun
1
half acre. See hanereg

:_______________________________.

++nerf, nerfau <NERV, NER-vai, -ve> [nɛrv, ˡnɛrvaɪ, -vɛ] (masculine noun)
1
nerve

:_______________________________.

++nerfol <NER-vol> [ˡnɛrvɔl] adjective
1
nervous (= relating to the nervous system)
y sustem nerfol the nervous system
y gyfundrefn nerfol the nervous system
chwalfa nerfol nervous breakdown

ETYMOLOGY: (
nerf = nerve) + (-ol)

:_______________________________.

++nerob <NEE-rob> [ˡneˑrɔb] feminine noun
1
flitch of bacon (side of bacon salted to preserve it) See hanerob

:_______________________________.

++nerog <NEE-rog> [ˡneˑrɔg] masculine noun
1
(county of Ynys Mn) variant of nerob (= side of bacon) See hanerob

:_______________________________.

++Nerpwl <NER-pul> [ˡnɛrpʊl] feminine noun
North Wales
1
variant form of
Lerpwl <LER-pul> [ˡlɛrpʊl] = Liverpool

ETYMOLOGY:
yn Lerpwl (= in Liverpool) > yn Nerpwl (= in Liverpool) (the change l > n has been conditioned by the final n of the preposition yn) > Nerpwl (= Liverpool).

The original form
Lerpwl in fact preserves an older English pronunciation of the name of this city

:_______________________________.

++nerth, nerthoedd <NERTH, NER-thoidh, -thodh> [ˡnɛrθ, ˡnɛrθɔɪ, -θɔ] (masculine noun)
1
strength
2
mewn undeb y mae nerth / mewn undeb mae nerth there is unity in strength

bloeddio 'ch holl nerth shout with all your might

:_______________________________.

++nerth eich braich <nerth əkh BRAIKH> [nɛrθ əx ˡbraɪx] (adverb)
1
with all one's might (with the strength of your arm)

:_______________________________.

++nerthu <NER-thi> [ˡnɛrθɪ] (verb)
1
strengthen

2
empower
nerthu rhywun i wneud rhywbeth give somebody the strength to do something

:_______________________________.

++Nerɥs <NEE-ris> [ˡneˑrɪs]

1 female name lady; female ruler
ETYMOLOGY: nr (= lord, chief) + (-ys, suffix for forming names)

See the entry -
ys

:_______________________________.

++1 nes <NES> [nɛs] (conjunction)
1
until

:_______________________________.

++2 nes <NEES> [neːs]

(adverb)
1
nearer

:_______________________________.

++nes ymlen <nes-əm-LAIN> [nɛs əmˡlaɪn] (adverb)
1
further on, further ahead

:_______________________________.

++nesaf / nesa <NE-sav, NE-sa> [ˡnɛsav, ˡnɛsa] (adjective)
1
next

:_______________________________.

++nesu / nesu <ne-SAI, NE-si> [nɛˡsaɪ, ˡnɛsɪ] (verb)
1
to get near, to approach

:_______________________________.

++Nĕst <NEST> [nɛst] (feminine noun)
1
womans name. Pronounced
Nst (with a long vowel) in the north <NEEST> [neːst]

:_______________________________.

++Nesta <NE-sta> [ˡnɛsta] (feminine noun)
1
womans name
ETYMOLOGY: Nest with the addition of a, used generally to form female names from male names (Ifan, Ifana), as in English (Robert, Roberta; Albert, Alberta) or Latin (Claudius, Claudia)

:_______________________________.

++nt <NEET> [neːt] adj
1
fine, splendid
(South-east)
Bachan nt yw e Hes one of the best (he is a neat man)
bad bach nt a fine little boat

2
yn nt well,exactly, nicely
Rwyt ti'n gwybod yn nt beth w-i'n 'feddwl You know exactly what I mean

ETYMOLOGY: English
neat, now pronounced as niit [niːt], but formerly as neet [neːt] this older pronunciation is preserved in Welsh. The word was taken into English 1500-1600 from Old French net < Latin nitidus (= clean, brilliant, shining) < nitre (= to shine).

A related word in Celtic has given Welsh
nwyf (= vivacity, zest, vigour; desire, feeling, passion) and Irish niamh (= beauty, brightness)

:_______________________________.

++neu <NEI> [nɛɪ] (conjunction)
1
or

It causes the soft mutation of a following noun or adjective

Reduced colloquially to
ne <NE> [nɛ]

:_______________________________.

++neuadd, neuaddau <NEI-adh, nei-AA-dhai, dhe> [ˡnəɪa, nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, -ɛ] (feminine noun)
1
hall

An older pronunciation preserved in many place names in the south is nouadd <NOI-adh> [ˡnɔɪa] (qv)
:_______________________________.

++neuadd bentref / bentre <NEI-adh BEN-trev / BEN-tre> [ˡnəɪa ˡbɛntrɛv / ˡbɛntrɛ] feminine noun
PLURAL neuaddau pentref <nei-AA-dhai, -e, PEN-trev / PEN-tre> [ nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, -ɛ, ˡpɛntrɛv / ˡpɛntrɛ]

1 village hall, place for social events in a village

NOTE: the definite form is neuadd y pentref the village hall

:_______________________________.

++neuadd blwyf / blwy <NEI-adh BLUIV / BLUI> [ˡnəɪa ˡblʊɪ / ˡblʊɪv] feminine noun
PLURAL neuaddau plwyf / plwy <nei-AA-dhai, -e, PEN-trev / PEN-tre> [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, -ɛ, ˡplʊɪ / ˡplʊɪv]
1
parish hall

NOTE: the definite form is neuadd y plwyf the parish hall

Cynhelir yr Eisteddfod yn Neuadd y Plwyf, Llandegfan
The Eisteddfod will be held in the Parish Hall, Llandegfan

:_______________________________.

++neuadd ddinas <NEI-adh DHII-nas> [ˡnəɪa ˡiˑnas] feminine noun
PLURAL
neuaddau dinas <nei-AA-dhai, -e, DII-nas > [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, -ɛ, ˡdiˑnas]
1
city hall, place where a city administration is situated
NOTE: the definite form is
neuadd y ddinas the city hall

ETYMOLOGY: translation of English
city hall hall (of) city; (neuadd = hall) + (dinas = city)

:_______________________________.

++neuadd farchnad <NEI-adh VARKH-nad> [ˡnəɪa ˡvarxnad] feminine noun
PLURAL neuaddau marchnad <nei-AA-dhai, -e, MARKH-nad> [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, -ɛ, ˡmarxnad]
1
market hall
NOTE: the definite form is
neuadd y farchnad the market hall

:_______________________________.

++neuadd goffa <NEI-adh GOO-fa> [ˡnəɪa ˡgoˑfa] feminine noun
PLURAL
neuaddau coffa <nei-AA-dhe-KOO-fa> [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, - ɛ, ˡkoˑfa]
1
memorial hall; a community hall constructed as a memorial to those from the local community who have died in war. Such a hall has a prominent plaque or monument with the names of the war victims
neuadd goffa gymunedol community memorial hall

ETYMOLOGY: hall (of) commemorating (
neuadd = hall) + soft mutation + (coffa = to commemorate)

:_______________________________.

++neuadd gymuned <NEI-adh gə-MII-ned> [ˡnəɪa gəˡmiˑnɛd] (feminine noun)
PLURAL
neuaddau cymuned <nei-AA-dhai, -e, kə-MII-ned> [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, - ɛ, kəˡmiˑnɛd]
1
community hall

:_______________________________.

++neuadd gyngerdd <NEI-adh -ngerdh > [ˡnəɪa ˡgəngɛr] (feminine noun)
PLURAL
neuaddau cyngerdd <nei-AA-dhai, -e, -ngerdh > [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, - ɛ, ˡkəngɛr]
1
concert hall

:_______________________________.

++neuadd gynull <NEI-adh GƏ-nilh > [ˡnəɪa ˡgənɪɬ] (feminine noun)
PLURAL
neuaddau cynull <nei-AA-dhai, -e, KƏ-nilh > [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, - ɛ, ˡkənɪɬ]
1
assembly hall

:_______________________________.

++neuadd dref / dre <NEI-adh DREEV / DREE> [ˡnəɪa ˡdreːv, ˡdreː] feminine noun
1
town hall (called in English in some places 'guildhall'); place where a town administration is situated

2
Hen Neuadd y Dre (the old town hall) street name in Pen-rallt, Machynlleth (county of Powys)

ETYMOLOGY: translation of English
town hall 'hall (of) town'; (neuadd = hall) + (tref = town)

NOTE: the definite form is
neuadd y dref 'the town hall'

:_______________________________.

++neuadd y ddinas <NEI-adh ə DHII-nas> [ˡnəɪa ə ˡiˑnas] feminine noun
1
'the town hall' See: neuadd dinas

:_______________________________.

++neuadd y dref <NEI-adh ə DREEV / DREE> [ˡnəɪa ə ˡdreːv, ˡdreː] feminine noun
1
'the town hall' See: neuadd dref

:_______________________________.

++neuadd y farchnad <NEI-adh ə VARKH-nad> [ˡnəɪa ə ˡvarxnad] feminine noun
1
'the market hall' See: neuadd farchnad

:_______________________________.

++neuadd ymarfer <NEI-adh ə-MAR-ver> [ˡnəɪa əˡmarvɛr] feminine noun
PLURAL
neuaddau ymarfer <nei-AA-dhai, -e, ə-MAR-ver > [nəɪˡɑˑaɪ, - ɛ, əˡmarvɛr]
1
drill hall = (obsolete) hall for military practices, where soldiers learn marching in formation, military music, military techniques. Such halls in the English state later became Territorial Army Centres.

ETYMOLOGY: 'hall (of) practising' (
neuadd = hall) + (ymarfer = to practise)

:_______________________________.

++neuadd y pentref / pentre <NEI-adh ə PEN-trev / PEN-tre> [ˡnəɪa ə ˡpɛntrɛv / ˡpɛntrɛ] feminine noun
1
'the village hall' See: neuadd bentref

:_______________________________.

++neuadd y plwyf <NEI-adh ə PLUIV / PLUI> [ˡnəɪa ə ˡplʊɪv / ˡplʊɪ] feminine noun
1
'the parish hall' See: neuadd blwyf

:_______________________________.

++neu beidio <NEI-BEID-YO> [nəɪ ˡbəɪdjɔ]
1
or not
Cymer e neu beidio Take it or leave it (take it or refrain)

ETYMOLOGY: (
neu = or) + soft mutation + (peidio to cease; to refrain (from doing something))

:_______________________________.

++neu ddim <nei DHIM> [nəɪ ˡɪm]
1
y cwbl neu ddim (its) all or nothing
nawr neu ddim (its) now or never

:_______________________________.

++neu well <nei WELH> [nəɪ ˡwɛɬ ]
1
or more
ganrif neu well yn l a century or more ago

ETYMOLOGY: (
neu = or) + soft mutation + (gwell = better)

:_______________________________.

++newid <NEU-id> [ˡnɛʊɪd] (verb)
1
to change

newid eich dillad to change your clothes
newid eich gwedd change your appearance, disguise oneself
newid er gwell to change for the better
newid er gwaeth to change for the worse
newid gwlad emigrate (change country)

2
sdim newid arno (= nid oes newid arno) hes set in his ways (theres no changing on him)

:_______________________________.

++newid, newidiadau <NEU-id, neu-id-YAA-dai, -e> [ˡnɛʊɪd, nɛʊɪdˡjɑˑdaɪ, -ɛ] masculine noun
1
change, alteration

2
newid er gwell a change for the better
newid er gwaeth a change for the worse

:_______________________________.

++newydd <NEU-idh> [ˡnɛʊɪ] (adjective)
1
new

2
Y Maesnewydd the new field place name
Maesnewydd name of street in Machynlleth, Powys

3
fel swllt newydd (like a new shilling) as fresh as paint
troi dalen newydd turn over a new leaf (turn a new leaf (of a book) / a new page)

4
Y Tainewydd the new houses place name
As a street name (
Tainewydd)
..1/ Brynsiencyn, Llanfairpwllgwyngyll (county of Mn)
..2/ Llanfaelog, Tŷ-croes (county of Mn)
..3/ Talwrn, Llangefni (county of Mn)
..4/ Ynys-y-bŵl (county of Rhondda Cynon Taf)

Also with the plural form of the adjective
newyddion
Tainewyddion name of streets in
..1/ Llandegla (county of Dinbych)
..2/ Gwytherin (county of Conwy)
..3/ Aberdyfi (county of Gwynedd)
..4/ Rhostryfan (county of Gwynedd)

:_______________________________.

++newydd PLURAL newyddion <NEU-idh, neu-IDH-yon> [ˡnɛʊɪ, nɛʊˡɪjɔn] (masculine noun)
1 rumour, piece of news, some news, something to tell you

ma' rhyw newydd ar droed bod... theres news going round that...

Mae gen i newydd mor dda i chi fel ag i wneud iawn digonol, efallai, am yr holl ffwdan
I have some news for you which is so good that perhaps itll quite make up for all the fuss (I caused)

2 papur newydd
newspaper paper (of) news

(papur = paper) + (newydd = piece of news; news)

:_______________________________.

++newyddair <neu-ƏDH-air> [nɛʊˡəaɪr]
masculine noun
PLURAL
newyddeiriau <neu-ədh-EIR-yai, -e> [nɛʊəˡəɪrjaɪ, -ɛ]
1
neologism, newly-coined word or phrase

ETYMOLOGY: (
newydd = new) + soft mutation + (gair = word)

:_______________________________.

++newyddbeth <neu-ƏDH-beth> [nɛʊˡəbɛθ] masculine noun
PLURAL
newyddbethau <neu-ədh-BEE-thai, -e> [nɛʊəˡbeˑθaɪ, -ɛ]
1
innovation
traddodiad a newyddbethau
tradition and innovation

2
novelty

ETYMOLOGY: (
newydd = new) + soft mutation + (peth = thing)

:_______________________________.

++newydd-ddyfodiad NEU-idh-dhə-VOD-yad [ˡnɛʊɪ əˡvɔdjad] masculine noun
PLURAL newydd-ddyfodiaid neu-idh-dhə-VOD-yaid, -yed [ˡnɛʊɪ əˡvɔdjaɪd, -ɛd]
1
newcomer
newydd-ddyfodiad gorau best newcomer

Ennill gwobr y newydd-ddyfodiad gorau to win the prize for best newcomer (to win (the) prize (of) the best newcomer)

Enillodd ef wobr y newydd-ddyfodiad gorau He won the prize for best newcomer

ETYMOLOGY: